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Topic: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers. (Read 2050 times) previous topic - next topic
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Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NMFQ3YvR3Eo

I'm not even going to say anything. Just... man...

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #1
When it got to the "crystal oscillator" part I lost my stuff

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #2
There's a new-age connection here, it seems.
The crystal, the stickers... I've seen these things before, unfortunately for me.
Many new-agers seem to believe that, by attaching "energetic crystals", or drawings containing "sacred geometry" patterns channeled from cosmic entities or whatever (be it fancy metallic stickers like in the video, or, as a lesser solucion, high-resolution laser prints on paper), they can "harmonize the energies" or something like that, remove or reduce "harmful frequencies" or who knows what.

Seeing this, I expect to see next (if it hasn't been done already), orgonites (idiotic clumps of wire, metal shavings, and other materials in "fancy" epoxy shapes that also channel "positive energy" and harmonize stuff...), amulets, pictures of "ascended masters", and more applied to audio...

What a dumpster fire.

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #3
There's a new-age connection here, it seems.
The crystal, the stickers... I've seen these things before, unfortunately for me.
Many new-agers seem to believe that, by attaching "energetic crystals", or drawings containing "sacred geometry" patterns channeled from cosmic entities or whatever (be it fancy metallic stickers like in the video, or, as a lesser solucion, high-resolution laser prints on paper), they can "harmonize the energies" or something like that, remove or reduce "harmful frequencies" or who knows what.

Seeing this, I expect to see next (if it hasn't been done already), orgonites (idiotic clumps of wire, metal shavings, and other materials in "fancy" epoxy shapes that also channel "positive energy" and harmonize stuff...), amulets, pictures of "ascended masters", and more applied to audio...

What a dumpster fire.

I haven't seen that stuff before with electronics, although I have heard of it with other things.  It all sounds like religious nonsense.  What a rabbit hole.

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #4
Wanna make a quick buck?  Make acrylic pyramids to sit on top of domestic electronics and absorb all the bad energy.
It's your privilege to disagree, but that doesn't make you right and me wrong.

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #5
Wanna make a quick buck?  Make acrylic pyramids to sit on top of domestic electronics and absorb all the bad energy.

777dB noisefloor guaranteed, even on 8bit audio.
Absorbs all quantization noise restoring the audio back to it's natural source before it was picked up by the microphone.
Boosts auditory perception rejuvenating your ears back to kindergarten.



CALL NOW!!!

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #6
That will do for now, until I get an upgraded version that also gives me ability to multichannel.

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #7
It still doesn't coffee.  ☕️

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #8
That will do for now, until I get an upgraded version that also gives me ability to multichannel.
You can also do that with this model, but you need to add the audiophile candles... sold separately.

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #9
I wonder how well the effects of this and the CD demagnetizer combine.

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #10
I wonder how well the effects of this and the CD demagnetizer combine.
Easy. First you demagnetise CD to remove any excess energies, then you apply any voodoo you have.
Error 404; signature server not available.

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #11
What I find even more stunning is the story surrounding tuning at 432Hz instead of 440Hz.

That story is, supposedly, that 432Hz is a nicer number, because it results in various intervals having an integer number. If you take for example a fifth up from 440Hz you get 586,66 etc., while when you take a fifth up from 432Hz you 576Hz. Accordingly, 432Hz gives you the most serene and peaceful music, and evil people in the past (a Godwin argument I won't repeat) have set tuning to 440Hz worldwide for evil purposes.

One finicky detail such a story conveniently leaves out is that Hertz is derived from the second which is a completely arbitrary unit of time.
Music: sounds arranged such that they construct feelings.

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #12
There is an interesting read on the "432" at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_pitch#History .
"Leonard Slatkin Serves Satan". Gotta love it.

But, there is something to downtuning, especially to those who have the idea that classical music belongs to its own time (if so, it shouldn't be played today, according to Nigel Kennedy).
Story: Pitch inflation seems to have been the "loudness war" of its time(s).

Here you can buy tuning forks for each integer 435 to 445. And a baroque 415. And, marked "New": 432.
(And dozenals are good for you! At least in Pythagorean tuning. The origin of the "432" was however to put middle C at 256, which is also a neat number. At least 440 isn't 439, which once was a standard. It is a prime number.)

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #13
Story: Pitch inflation seems to have been the "loudness war" of its time(s).
Yes, that is certainly true. Also, there are specific baroque orchestra's performing at much lower tuning, I think 415Hz is most commonly used for baroque music. I know many wind orchestra's use even higher tuning, up to 443Hz I believe.

However, the notion that integer frequencies would sound better is ridiculous. Not only because of the fact that the second is something invented by humans (not a constant of the universe or whatever) but also because most musical instruments are unable to use pure/just intonation but have to resort to some sort of temperament (the piano being the most notable example).
Music: sounds arranged such that they construct feelings.

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #14
What I find even more stunning is the story surrounding tuning at 432Hz instead of 440Hz.
That story is, supposedly, that 432Hz is a nicer number, because it results in various intervals having an integer number. If you take for example a fifth up from 440Hz you get 586,66 etc., while when you take a fifth up from 432Hz you 576Hz.
That's what's called a "perfect fourth". The frequency factor for the equal-tempered version of A perfect fifth is 2^(7/12) while the pure-tuned version is 3/2.

Quote
One finicky detail such a story conveniently leaves out is that Hertz is derived from the second which is a completely arbitrary unit of time.
Being a music composer and microtonalist myself, I've wondered many times why it is so enormously difficult for a lot of people to understand the fact that the length of one second is nothing other than a matter of convention and agreement. It is similarly difficult for me to understand what makes them think that one second is something of similar significance to one day or one year.


Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #15
It is similarly difficult for me to understand what makes them think that one second is something of similar significance to one day or one year.
Don't you count the  9192631770 microbeats making up this perfectly natural and significant time interval?
;-)

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #16
Since this has gone rather off-topic already:

One finicky detail such a story conveniently leaves out is that Hertz is derived from the second which is a completely arbitrary unit of time.

Historical? yes. To be improved upon? perhaps. But I wouldn't say "completely arbitrary".
Nevertheless. If established convention were to be entirely ignored, what would be a better, "non-arbitrary" alternative to the second? What would it be based on? Would it be just for scientific/technical use or also to replace the current timekeeping system for everyday use?

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #17
what would be a better, "non-arbitrary" alternative to the second?
There is none. Like every other unit of measurement really: the meter is arbitrary too, as is the mile, the volt, the ampere, the gram etc.

The problem here is certain people seem to think having a whole number of something makes it better. To me, that would be like saying that it is better to run your amp on 200V instead of 230V or 115V because it is a rounder number. Or that a speaker with an impedance of 10 ohm is better than one of 8 ohm because the number is rounder. Or that having exactly 3 yard of speaker wire is better than having 2.9 yard because it is a whole number. Or that weighing your speaker down with 8 kilograms is better than 8.12kg because it is an integer number. It just doesn't make sense. Then why would it make sense that a tuning that has more round numbers would be better?
Music: sounds arranged such that they construct feelings.

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #18
There is none.
I didn't mean an existing one. Rather, is it possible, in your mind, to conceive a non-arbitrary alternative to the second?

Or is your point that any possible unit of measurement that could be conceived will necessarily be arbitrary?

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #19
I wouldn't say "completely arbitrary".
Not completely arbitrary. It is a day (/day & night) divided by some neat composite integer. Well it isn't an exact day.

But let's presume it is an exact one. One 432 Hz cycle is one 24*60*60*12*6*6th of a day&night ... 150 mod 12. That "150" was dumb. I'd rather have 144 to get it divisible by a power of 12. That leads to a tone of 414.72 Hz - damn close to that baroque tuning, a little further off the 415.30 Hz G# in standard 440 Hz tuning (aaaand, there once was a 439). G#, how inconvenient ... but who decided to assign letter "A" to ... and not to the "baroque tuning" A?

See what I did? An arbitrary fiddling of numbers. Not "completely arbitrary" as in division by a pseudo-random number, but "arbitrary" enough. And I didn't have to fiddle a lot to end up with something ... workable.

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #20
There is none.
I didn't mean an existing one. Rather, is it possible, in your mind, to conceive a non-arbitrary alternative to the second?

Or is your point that any possible unit of measurement that could be conceived will necessarily be arbitrary?
Except Planck time perhaps, but that isn't practical to work with. So one still has to pick an arbitrary number to multiply that with to get to something that makes sense to humans.

Anyway, my point isn't really that units are arbitrary (or maybe 'engineered' or 'man-made' is a better term) but that people assign qualities to having integer amounts of such units.
Music: sounds arranged such that they construct feelings.

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #21
It's hard to reconcile integers having mystical qualities when the Golden Ratio is an irrational, as are pi and e.
It's your privilege to disagree, but that doesn't make you right and me wrong.

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #22
As a German, it doesn't surprise me that this "beefed-up" 10$ switch is offered by a german company.
You can get SH*TLOADS of ridiculously esoterical and bizarre audio "improvement" equipment over here.

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #23
As a German, it doesn't surprise me that this "beefed-up" 10$ switch is offered by a german company.
You can get SH*TLOADS of ridiculously esoterical and bizarre audio "improvement" equipment over here.

Not exactly what's traditionally understood as "german engineering" :(

Re: Audiophile Ethernet switches... and NAS servers.

Reply #24
Not exactly what's traditionally understood as "german engineering" :(
There's a certain niche market for bored out mid life crisis men with too much money here.
Traditionally they buy a sports or luxury car, but some invest in speaker cables with the diameter of their forearm.
Just a few weeks ago I searched the german version of Craigslist for some random stuff, just to find out some sensible looking person in the next street is offering his used "high end" HDMI cables for 1200€  among other super-expensive boutique AV stuff.