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1
General A/V / MKV a_dts codec and A/V receivers
Last post by Sakonosolo -
I've been pulling my hair out recently about this issue and maybe it isn't an issue at all. So my setup right now is I have mkv bluray rips with DTS-HD MA audio tracks (in the MKV a_dts codec) on a portable HDD, plugged into a bluray player (Samsung BD-HM57C/ZA, which supports DTS-HD MA audio), which is plugged into a Denon AVRS930H receiver, which is then plugged into my TV. The bluray player is set to bitstream to send unprocessed audio to the receiver. When I play one of these files though, I'm not able to select DTS-HD MA audio on the receiver, it defaults to DTS + Neural X as the highest quality form of audio I can select. Now my question is, is it selecting this because of something to do with the a_dts codec the MKV file is using? And in using this audio profile on the receiver am I not getting the full, lossless audio or is it just a display issue because of the codec and the audio is how it's supposed to be?
2
I have some music on CD's in .cda format. I'm trying to figure out if they were originally mp3's or wav's and what quality they were.
There's no point ripping them as 320kbps mp3's if they were originally only 160kbps. If they were wav's then I'd probably want to rip them as flac.

Basically I'm trying to retain maximum audio quality without using unnecessary hard drive space.


As was pointed out, there is no reliable way to detect past passes through lossy compression by means of easy and reliable technical analysis. However, there is a good probability that the music was lossy-compressed if there are obvious signs of low-pass brick-wall filtering at some frequency well  below 22 KHz.
3
It's very unlikely that a commercial CD was made from an MP3.   If it's a homemade/burned CD, who knows. 

I'd recommend ripping to whatever format you usually use.    If you normally use FLAC, a few more FLAC files aren't going to eat-up much more disk space.

The damage from multiple generations of MP3 compression does accumulate...  So, if it was originally a 128 or 160kbps, made into a WAV or CD, and then re-encoded to 160kbps, or even 320kbps, there is additional theoretical damage.    

You may or may-not hear a difference.     Of course in this case, you can only compare the two MP3s (or an MP3 and a WAV made from an MP3) if you don't have access to the uncompressed original.
4
I have some music on CD's in .cda format.
I suppose you are talking about CDDA shown in Windows Explorer.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.cda_file

CDDA only supports 16/44 PCM, you can't put mp3 data in CDDA without transcoding them to 16/44 PCM. When you rip a CDDA with mp3 sources, you can only rip the transcoded 16/44 PCM data, not the mp3 data.

Regardless of the source format, the only way to retain data integrity of CDDA is rip to lossless formats like ape, flac, wavpack and so on. Ripping to mp3 is a lossy transcoding process.

Short answer: forget about how to identify mp3 sources and bitrates, always rip to flac if what you need is data integrity instead of transparency.

5
Yeah I was kinda expecting that :/

I tried encoding a song at 320 and 160 and I really can't tell the difference. I was only comparing 1 section of 1 song though, so others might be more obvious.
6
You're right about the tags, they weren't ever working with Opus here either. Not with the built-in nor external encoder.

I have various tests streams. Maybe I had seen the ogg/vorbis one and got confused.

I've yet to try LiquidSoap on linux. Maybe "Ubuntu Bash for Windows 10" is an option.

Actually, IDK what I did but I retried again and the built-in encoder has working metadata when viewing the stream on foobar2000. I think I tested too quickly last time.

Still at a no go when using the external encoder options with opusenc.exe
7
Quote
[T]he Album List is mostly a stock tree view, while the Playlist Viewer is entirely a custom control.
As the OP noted, it's the "built-in" viewer. I expect that to handle shift-clicks in the same way the built-in Album List does.
8
There is no reliable way to do this.
9
I have some music on CD's in .cda format. I'm trying to figure out if they were originally mp3's or wav's and what quality they were.
There's no point ripping them as 320kbps mp3's if they were originally only 160kbps. If they were wav's then I'd probably want to rip them as flac.

Basically I'm trying to retain maximum audio quality without using unnecessary hard drive space.

10
3rd Party Plugins - (fb2k) / Re: foo_softplaylists
Last post by davideleo -
Unfortunately I cannot find the fb2k-component file, so this is the dll I have in my user-componets folder which has to be installed manually.
foo_softplaylists.fb2k-component - https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B-52fIoCowfjdFNtMlJnMk9UVGM


Thanks! I actually have this one and as far as I understand fuffi has it, too. What I meant is I cannot find the fb2k-component file, of the 2011 version.