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1
Scientific Discussion / Re: Audio Summing Algorithm
Last post by ziemek.z -
Speakers (and rooms) aren't perfect, and the impulse response of a speaker also depends on the position of the listener's ear in space.
If you add different and random EQ and reverb to each channel of each track which you are mixing, you'll surely also hear something even if they were to cancel each other otherwise, unless you are infinitely (un)lucky.
How does it relate to "smart" downmixing?
4
Scientific Discussion / Re: Audio Summing Algorithm
Last post by magicgoose -
However, what if signals are out-of-phase?
In the worst-case scenario (two inverted signals, as in attached picture) waveforms cancel each other and after down-mixing you'll hear literally NOTHING!
This is true even if you don't mix but instead use two different sound sources. So actually not trying to avoid this gives you very high, real-life physics accuracy ;-)
Nope, left and right speaker are separate (best case scenario: headphones - near-perfect channel separation). This is why we can hear audio even if the speakers play signals being inverse of each other.

Speakers (and rooms) aren't perfect, and the impulse response of a speaker also depends on the position of the listener's ear in space.
If you add different and random EQ and reverb to each channel of each track which you are mixing, you'll surely also hear something even if they were to cancel each other otherwise, unless you are infinitely (un)lucky.
6
Scientific Discussion / Re: Audio Summing Algorithm
Last post by ziemek.z -
ziemek.z:
care to post a few samples with the sources and results of this mixing approach? (I presume you have some software implementation at hand)
I'm actually looking for software for FFT-based downmixing - I can't program it because I don't have enough skill... :/
I can't access computer at the moment, so I'm posting a sample of BAD downmixing by simple averaging samples.
This is the most obvious and ugliest example of simple downmixing. This doesn't apply only to this track, though; whenever I turn on "Convert stereo to mono" in music player, I hear that mono audio is dull. I have the same feeling while listening to my radio - bad stereo separation provided by my tiny "gear" combined with not so good signal reception means that I'm practically listening to mono radio. It sounds as dull as while downmixing in my music player. (Unfortunately radio has to perform downmix that way, that is L+R, not by FFT, otherwise it couldn't send stereo audio through radio.)
7
Scientific Discussion / Re: Audio Summing Algorithm
Last post by ziemek.z -
However, what if signals are out-of-phase?
In the worst-case scenario (two inverted signals, as in attached picture) waveforms cancel each other and after down-mixing you'll hear literally NOTHING!
This is true even if you don't mix but instead use two different sound sources. So actually not trying to avoid this gives you very high, real-life physics accuracy ;-)
Nope, left and right speaker are separate (best case scenario: headphones - near-perfect channel separation). This is why we can hear audio even if the speakers play signals being inverse of each other.
8
Audio Hardware / Re: Searching for a tube amp / compressor
Last post by magicgoose -
Quote
I want to be able to make it sound "nicer", "warmer", and more dynamic

A compressor, by definition, may only reduce dynamics but never increase.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_range_compression
 If you want to increase dynamics, you either want something other than compressor, or you're using your own definition of the word "dynamic".

Quote
i want Hardware (for sound quality and reliability...)

What makes you think that hardware would achieve better quality?
9
Scientific Discussion / Re: Audio Summing Algorithm
Last post by magicgoose -
This software seems to be in the area that you are discussing:
https://www.soundradix.com/products/pi/
This was a link to a software which is proprietary, requires registration and is apparently infested with DRM ("iLok").
I asked for samples only. This one looks more like some situational marketing.

However, what if signals are out-of-phase?
In the worst-case scenario (two inverted signals, as in attached picture) waveforms cancel each other and after down-mixing you'll hear literally NOTHING!
This is true even if you don't mix but instead use two different sound sources. So actually not trying to avoid this gives you very high, real-life physics accuracy ;-)
Yeah that's what I said.
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