Skip to main content

Notice

Please note that most of the software linked on this forum is likely to be safe to use. If you are unsure, feel free to ask in the relevant topics, or send a private message to an administrator or moderator. To help curb the problems of false positives, or in the event that you do find actual malware, you can contribute through the article linked here.
Topic: Is the audio cache area of 64 bytes before and after effective information? (Read 646 times) previous topic - next topic
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Is the audio cache area of 64 bytes before and after effective information?

Hi!
I have recently been studying whether the low-offset value of the optical driver can completely grab the audio problem.
I did not have a low offset value drive except the offset value of 6, so I tried to use Cuetools for operation.
I first modified a "-6" offset value of a audio, and then changed it back to find that all the audio MD5 could be paired.
I tried to expand the range again, and finally found that as long as the amount of modification was less than "16" samples, they could eventually match.
But higher than 16 sampling, the effective information of the audio will be changed.
16 samples, that is, 64 bytes, this number is very complete for computers.
I want to know if there are any specifications or documents, stipulate that there is such a similar cache area before and after the audio, which can store audio information not higher than 64 bytes without being read by us?
I hope someone can answer, thanks!

Re: Is the audio cache area of 64 bytes before and after effective information?

Reply #1
I forgot to supplement the audio frequency spectrum, because the information of the last track was filled, so I had this question. This problem was not caused by mute filling.


Re: Is the audio cache area of 64 bytes before and after effective information?

Reply #2
No.
Number of samples with digital silence in the start/end varies between different CDs.

Re: Is the audio cache area of 64 bytes before and after effective information?

Reply #3
I really do not understand the question. Also, it seems (?) related to CDDA ripping, so was this posted to FLAC by accident, or does it in fact have something to do with FLAC?
Music: sounds arranged such that they construct feelings.

Re: Is the audio cache area of 64 bytes before and after effective information?

Reply #4
No.
Number of samples with digital silence in the start/end varies between different CDs.
Thank you for your reply!
But my track isn't silent at the end, which is why I used it as a test case.

Re: Is the audio cache area of 64 bytes before and after effective information?

Reply #5
I really do not understand the question. Also, it seems (?) related to CDDA ripping, so was this posted to FLAC by accident, or does it in fact have something to do with FLAC?
I'm not sure if this is related to the production of CD-ROM, because I don't have enough samples in my hands.
But what I can answer is that I successfully use the original file in the WAV format for modification of offset value and restore it. The range is still 16 sampling.

Re: Is the audio cache area of 64 bytes before and after effective information?

Reply #6
The only reason you were able to remove and restore those samples is because they were zero. If you tried the same thing but with nonzero samples, it wouldn't work.

Tools like AccurateRip use hashes that ignore samples near the beginning and end of the CD.

Re: Is the audio cache area of 64 bytes before and after effective information?

Reply #7
The only reason you were able to remove and restore those samples is because they were zero. If you tried the same thing but with nonzero samples, it wouldn't work.

Tools like AccurateRip use hashes that ignore samples near the beginning and end of the CD.
[link removed - TOS 9]
This is my test CD. Obviously his last track is full, not silent.
I have put his waveform diagram in #1.

 

Re: Is the audio cache area of 64 bytes before and after effective information?

Reply #8
The dots in the diagram indicate the samples. The dots for the seven samples shown in the diagram are all located at -∞ dBFS, which is zero amplitude. Since those samples are zero, deleting them and replacing them with more zeroes doesn't change the waveform.