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Topic: CD's ripped to wave files, the bitrate always shows as "1411." What does that mean? (Read 5858 times) previous topic - next topic
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Re: CD's ripped to wave files, the bitrate always shows as "1411." What does that mean?

Reply #25
Yeah if decoding/loading FLAC files is noticeably slower than WAV - I think there's some kind of other issue going on.

Parsing the FLAC metadata is very fast - it's at the beginning of the file, you're not going to have to read a whole lot of the file to get all the metadata out. Decoding is also pretty fast - like other users said, no matter what compression level is used, it doesn't have a big impact on decoding.

I don't know if there's some component or external tags DB or... something that's causing stuff to happen when a FLAC is loaded. Again sounds like something is misconfigured.

Re: CD's ripped to wave files, the bitrate always shows as "1411." What does that mean?

Reply #26
I use FLAC sometimes and consider it to be just as lossless, but it can be a bit annoying how long it takes to load. I don't rip CDs often; I just kinda get whatever I can off the internet in the best quality I can find, and make random video game-related stuff in LMMS whenever I feel like it. Sorry for still being off-topic, anyway.
foobar2000 converts it to PCM automatically, and assuming you're right, it doesn't matter what the compression level is, but because of the conversion, it takes a bit longer than WAV.
Loading files in editing software like LMMS is completely different from loading files in software player like foobar2000.

Here are evidences that loading file into foobar2000 does not invoke decoding:

First post:
https://hydrogenaud.io/index.php/topic,114816.msg1032465.html#msg1032465

Second post:
It is pretty easy to see how foobar2000 2.0 can seemingly capable of identifying the base format is 16-bit float, but as long as I play it and run it through the integrity checker it shows error. It is based on the assumption that any type 3 format must be float rather than looking into the audio data.

As you can see, even for unsupported formats like 16-bit float .wav files, the files are still being loaded into the playlist. As long as you don't play the file or do other steps to invoke full file decoding, foobar only reads the file headers to get the files loaded into the playlist, so you are completely mistaken. So, please stop this misinformation.
I was basing on what someone said in this thread, sorry. No need to get aggressive, I'm just saying what I've heard. They're probably referring to something else. I can confirm FLACs take longer to load than WAVs, anyway, even if it's only half a second.
Sincerely, LegoLoco7

Re: CD's ripped to wave files, the bitrate always shows as "1411." What does that mean?

Reply #27
Yeah if decoding/loading FLAC files is noticeably slower than WAV - I think there's some kind of other issue going on.

Parsing the FLAC metadata is very fast - it's at the beginning of the file, you're not going to have to read a whole lot of the file to get all the metadata out. Decoding is also pretty fast - like other users said, no matter what compression level is used, it doesn't have a big impact on decoding.

I don't know if there's some component or external tags DB or... something that's causing stuff to happen when a FLAC is loaded. Again sounds like something is misconfigured.
I have a lot of plugins/components, so I have no idea.
Sincerely, LegoLoco7

Re: CD's ripped to wave files, the bitrate always shows as "1411." What does that mean?

Reply #28
Support for 16-bit float has been re-introduced in the meantime, but your point still stands.

(Also, user writes things like "consider it to be just as lossless" ... O'Rlyeh?)
What? I'm sorry if I sound weird; I can't help it sometimes. And don't even accuse me of being young, because I'm not that young, just maybe a bit misinformed.
Sincerely, LegoLoco7

Re: CD's ripped to wave files, the bitrate always shows as "1411." What does that mean?

Reply #29
"Lossless" audio is not a matter of subjective considerations: decode the FLAC and you will get your audio back bit by bit. Playing back the .flac and the .wav is like playing back the .wav twice. 
It is not like MP3 where it sounds alike to the human ear at sufficiently high bitrates, but still are subtly different signals when you compare the numbers.

That said, if you are also looking for something that preserves not only audio but also everything else like tags, you will have to use extra command options to the reference encoder to have FLAC store it.

Re: CD's ripped to wave files, the bitrate always shows as "1411." What does that mean?

Reply #30
I was basing on what someone said in this thread, sorry. No need to get aggressive, I'm just saying what I've heard. They're probably referring to something else. I can confirm FLACs take longer to load than WAVs, anyway, even if it's only half a second.
Not "probably", it is a thread about a MIDI plugin, so it is simply unrelated to loading .wav or flac files.

A "MIDI mapper" is originally used to interact with hardware synthesizers like Roland Sound Canvas and Yamaha MU series, I have one of them. When playing MIDI files, the computer is only responsible for sending MIDI data to the hardware synthesizer, and the synthesizer is responsible for transforming the MIDI data to actual audio samples. If you want to store the output as .wav or flac you will need to record the audio output from the synthesizers, for example, analog line out or SPDIF.  Nowadays most people use software-based synthesizers, and the performance of software synthesizers is independent from foobar2000 because foobar2000 is not responsible for the synthesis, it just sends MIDI data to the synth engine and receives the resulting PCM data.

So the whole thing has nothing to do with flac vs .wav at all. Firstly, not all synths use pre-recorded samples, secondly, even for synths using pre-recorded samples like SoundFonts, they don't store the samples as flac, and for other proprietary synths they would just use their own undisclosed sample formats.

It is not about getting aggressive, it is because your replies don't make any sense at all, therefore I have to address these things to avoid these kinds of misinformation to spread.