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1
General - (fb2k) / Composer Metadata
Last post by chongy -
Hello, I'm new to using foobar. I have added the composer metadata, how do I get it to show as a column in foobar? I tried adding a new column but composer isn't under the options.
2
If the tracks you converted are, in the playlist, the only ones with mp3 extension, try to save the playtlist (in fpl), open it as text with a good notepad (like Notepad++), use the function for replace all .mp3 strings with .wma strings, and save the file.
If the tracks you converted aren't, in the playlist, the only ones with mp3 extension, copy the interested entries (the tracks you converted) of the playlist in another empty playlist, save it, and use the method I suggested to replace the strings.
Now you can load the modified playlist, with extension replaced, in the original playlist to replace the tracks with playback error due the changed extension of the files.

A not so completely automatic method, but very simple and fast to replace in few time also a large amount of entries of a playlist without recreate the structure of the involved entries.
This method supposes that, in the paths of the files, the string .mp3 is only in the extension (so neither in the folders names nor in the filenames).

Thank you. I will try first the answer (solution) deliver from @Coreda and if I don't success, I try your suggestion ;)
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My understanding of the question is wanting to remove dead entries of the MP3 versions from a static playlist automatically, since the tracks have been replaced with WMA versions.

If the purpose of the playlist was to contain all the music from your library (which based on the scrollbar length it might) then I'd recommend using a library viewer panel instead (I personally use both Facets and EsPlaylist which include nice cover art support), which will automatically add/remove items as you change them in Windows based on the Preferences>Music Library>Music Paths folders being tracked in foobar2000.

Alternatively you can create 'autoplaylists' which are similar to regular playlists but are based on the premise of filtering the library in a playlist form to show only a range of things matching the terms you input (such as showing only music that has the genre tag of 'rock', or the most played tracks recently, etc). I use JScript Panel's JSPlaylist for this since it has a nicer interface.

Thank you very much ! I don't understand all, but I will read other times in order to understand better.
I understand the english but not all words, syntax.
(I use website "duolingo" to improve my english)
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Not to mention that there is no way that response at 20 Hz and below can be accurately reproduced by a LP.
But maybe by an EP played back at 16 2/3. A switch every kid who had access to it just had to try, right?

IIRC there were some turntables where you had to remove the platter and gear the belt manually between 45 and 33 1/3. Certainly there must have been a demand among parents.

Its not the turntable speed that is the key factor here. It is the tone arm resonance which is the same no matter what the rotational speed is.  The tone arm and cartridge compliance forms a modestly damped high pass filter.  The damping is enough so that the resonance is pretty broad and covers the first few octaves of the audible range. By convention, the corner (peaking) frequency is around 12 Hz or so. So, it has quite a bit of positive resonance at 20 Hz and the  next octave up.  The lightly damped curve then goes into its dip and is probably still has measurable effects up to around 100 Hz.  This would be for an optimal cartridge for that particular tone arm. 

How many cartridges and arms are actually optimal combinations in the field?  Given that typically only geometric measurements are done (which are irrelevant to this issue) are used during setup, probably not a heck of a lot. 
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I must say I have some problems getting at what you're asking. It seems there are multiple questions here. Perhaps you could try using google translate to make it more clear.
But for starters, unless you have a good reason to convert mp3 to wma, doing that is a bad idea and will only serve to give bad audio quality on an inferior audio codec.

Sincerely, I use it to have more space on disk, the quality seems to be the same, but I know it's false, but I'm happy with in.
I do that also because on my mp3 player, I don't have enough space, and I have a lot of music who I love. the file which have a size 10 Mb on mp3 have 3 or 4 Mb on wma (96 kbps 44100 Hz).

Ok I use wordreferece, but traducing online text traduce bad, it's not the equivalence.

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General A/V / Re: Swarm Recording
Last post by saratoga -
Genlock (generator locking) is a common technique where the video output of one source, or a specific reference signal from a signal generator, is used to synchronize other television picture sources together.

Yes this is what Arnold is referring to, although for audio clocks rather than video.  The problem is that there is not an easy way to get at this signal given how most SOCs are designed.  Usually anything running off an RF clock is isolated from the rest of the system by FIFOs. 

I think the reason for this is that RF signals are intermittent and subject to interference, and high frequency digital circuits are extremely sensitive to clock errors and/or glitches, so it is probably easier to just keep everything running from a known good oscillator. 
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2. How come there was never a competitor to redbook CDs that actually uses somekind of lossless compression (let's say like DVD-A can use Meridial Lossless).

By the time the hardware was available to do something like that cost-effectively, CDs were so completely entrenched that there was no room for an alternative format. 


I am not so sure of that. About when could Shorten be decoded in real-time? One could very well have dumped audio files to a data CD-ROM.

It is not about when it could be decoded in real-time, it is about when you could do so without having to commit enormous engineering costs to build the first unit.  That would be roughly 2000, when mass produced programmable audio hardware became reasonably well available at a price you could afford without selling tens of millions per year.  After then you could just buy the hardware, write the decoder, and then assemble a product without having to customize or even design your own chips.

Prior to that you could certainly have designed some kind of stripped down SHN decoder around a TI DSP core, and then paid someone to fab it for you, but the upfront costs would have been immense, and all to stretch a CD out from 80 minutes to perhaps 100 minutes.  There were much cheaper ways to do that back in those days, which is what everyone did instead. 

But I cannot imagine industry support - rather, one would have to expect major costs fighting the RIAA back then when they tried to restrict audio-on-CD-R to very special hardware and media.

I imagine if you'd pitched that to Sony in 1996, they'd have pointed out that they could easily expand the capacity of a CD by more than 30% just by increasing the NA of the read out optics without having to spend a small fortune on semiconductors.  Remember, by the late 1990s things like GD-ROM were already commercially available with larger capacity and almost no cost premium:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GD-ROM

You'd probably have had better luck ten years earlier than that, but the chips would have been even more expensive in the 1980s. 

This does not answer my question. My question was mostly asking how was the data modulated on the actual tape since technically a DCC tape does not differ to a Cassette tape as much as they differ to DAT and VHS tapes. The whole key was the modulation/demodulation process which I can't seem to be able to replicate. I doubt that a DCC tape as a media allowed for higher bandwith storage, it should be ideantical to a cassette tape.

I have no idea what the modulation used was, but this is contradicted by the wiki article you linked, which claims they used both a different type of recording head and a different type of tape than ordinary audio cassettes.  My guess is that the tape and head they choose encoded more data per unit area. 
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General A/V / Re: Swarm Recording
Last post by 2tec -
Genlock (generator locking) is a common technique where the video output of one source, or a specific reference signal from a signal generator, is used to synchronize other television picture sources together. The aim in video applications is to ensure the coincidence of signals in time at a combining or switching point. When video instruments are synchronized in this way, they are said to be generator-locked, or genlocked. ~ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genlock
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By a decade ago, it was probably too late introducing a new format based on physical CDs.  (DVDs were already cheap to press, but the DVD-based audio-only formats were dying.)
That some did make CDs with excerpts or "overburning" does not mean there would be room for another format - a new format is much more expensive than a double CD.

You need to go back some twenty years. To the time when all the big hardware players had agreed on a joint move to push DVD, not willing to risk a VHS/Betamax format war. They already had too many video hacks for CD, and they were going to replace those by one new format. However, they failed at replacing the CD for audio. But the RIAA did in part succeed in restricting audio-playable CD-ROMs. So there went the "natural" CD-based competition.
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Not to mention that there is no way that response at 20 Hz and below can be accurately reproduced by a LP.
But maybe by an EP played back at 16 2/3. A switch every kid who had access to it just had to try, right?

IIRC there were some turntables where you had to remove the platter and gear the belt manually between 45 and 33 1/3. Certainly there must have been a demand among parents.