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Topic: Cheaap Coaxial Output on PC (Read 2072 times) previous topic - next topic
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Cheaap Coaxial Output on PC

Hello Guys,
I need a solution to connect my Audiolab M-Dac to my PC. The USB Port is already in use by my Phone and Laptop to play music when my PC is not running.

If possible I would like to connect it via Coax because it's the only way it supports 192khz. I don't know if there is much of a difference but I would really like to try it out. Otherwise Toslink will probably be good, too.

My Mainboard has onboard Toslink but it doesn't work properly. There are glitches and timeouts where the DAC looses the signal like every ten seconds. The Cable and the DAC work fine on several other outputs.

An USB switch would be my last option because I can't switch it with the remote of the DAC.

I have checked on amazon for simple USB to coax adapters and i have found two models. Both are around 60€. I don't understand why they are so expensive. Isn't it just a simple USB controller? The Circuit can't be that complicated. (looking at 24/96 and 24/192 capable devices)

I also checked for an internal solution. None of them are linux compatible. This is an issue for me because I don't know if I will switch to linux when Windows 10 support ends.

Is there a reason for the expensive USB converters? Are there any DIY projects or hacks out there that are cheaper? Is there an easy way to extract the audio from HDMI?


Re: Cheaap Coaxial Output on PC

Reply #2
If you Google "USB to SPDIF converter", you will find cheaper solutions.
https://www.audiosciencereview.com/forum/index.php?threads/phiree-u2s-2019-douk-audio-u2-review-and-measurements-digital-usb-to-s-pdif-interfaces.29765/

The send rate of SPDIF is used to generate the sample rate. It must have a low jitter. You mobo SPDIF probably fails because of this.
TheWellTemperedComputer.com

Re: Cheaap Coaxial Output on PC

Reply #3
Well I guess the Douk Audio on is it. It's way too expensive for what it is in my opinion but if it works without any trouble, I can live with that. The other one from the ASR Post is not available anymore / where I live.

https://www.amazon.de/Konverter-Digitale-Schnittstelle-TOSLINK-PCM192Khz/dp/B0779S6NC6/ref=sr_1_9?__mk_de_DE=%C3%85M%C3%85%C5%BD%C3%95%C3%91&crid=2N4AVDDZG4EFD&keywords=usb%2Bto%2Bspdif&qid=1704028552&sprefix=usb%2Bto%2Bspdif%2Caps%2C97&sr=8-9&th=1


Re: Cheaap Coaxial Output on PC

Reply #5
If possible I would like to connect it via Coax because it's the only way it supports 192khz.
I wouldn't worry about that. Your ears don't need more than 48kHz (unless you're a bat or dolphin or something).

My Mainboard has onboard Toslink but it doesn't work properly.
Have you tried it at 48kHz?

I have checked on amazon for simple USB to coax adapters and i have found two models. Both are around 60€. I don't understand why they are so expensive. Isn't it just a simple USB controller? The Circuit can't be that complicated. (looking at 24/96 and 24/192 capable devices)
The target demographic is people who think spending more money equals better sound.

Is there an easy way to extract the audio from HDMI?
Yes, but keep in mind some of them don't work unless you have a display attached.

Re: Cheaap Coaxial Output on PC

Reply #6
I wouldn't worry about that. Your ears don't need more than 48kHz (unless you're a bat or dolphin or something).
Superb paper, thanks.  I particularly liked this:

Quote
Controversy exists only within the consumer and enthusiast audiophile communities.
It's your privilege to disagree, but that doesn't make you right and me wrong.

Re: Cheaap Coaxial Output on PC

Reply #7
A long time ago I used to connect coaxial directly to pins on the motherboard.
I don't know if that would still work on modern motherboards nowadays.