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  • Benliq
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Headphone Recommendation
My HD598s are wearing out so I'm looking out for a new pair of headphones.

One thing in particular I don't like about them is their physical presence around the ears. The heavy velour pads plus its clamp force get the area around my ears hot in a very short time.

Would on-ear headphones be better in this sense? Ones with weaker clamping perhaps?

  • Duceboia
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Re: Headphone Recommendation
Reply #1
I have Aiaiai tma2 studio preset modded by spirit labs: killer for metal with rockboxed devices (little eq. For limit the amount of bass)... lovin these but sure not using to listen Chet Baker.
In this sonic universe I use Superlux hd681 evo... lately using these much more even
For rock... 35€ on amazon.it  with velour pads . I even get rid of a pair of Grado sr80i due to the Superlux. Sennheiser Momentum over ear is liyng in a drower, promised for a gift.

Re: Headphone Recommendation
Reply #2
My HD598s are wearing out so I'm looking out for a new pair of headphones.

One thing in particular I don't like about them is their physical presence around the ears. The heavy velour pads plus its clamp force get the area around my ears hot in a very short time.

Would on-ear headphones be better in this sense? Ones with weaker clamping perhaps?

The heavy clamping force is an effective means for increasing bass response.

I've been trying what may be a radical approach to selecting headphones.

I've moved as much of my headphone listening as possible over to my Nvidia touchpad. It handles 192 GB uSD card so it is posslbe to carry around a fairly large music library. And if that doesn't get it, I can access my household LAN and its file servers which are practically unlimited.

I augment my headphones de jour with a little Android app called Neutralizer. It combines a warble tone based hearing evaluation methodology with the standard Android octave equalizer so it actually has negligible CPU overhead.  I've been going though my headphone stash and systematically equalizing them and then spending a lot of time listening to them.  Now, many of my headphones seem to sound very similar to each other, and within fair limits, exactly what I want. And, If I think there is too much or too little of something, I know where to change it almost instantly.

This kind of approach takes a lot of pickiness out of picking headphones. No longer am I dependent on design trade-offs to get the sound I want, provided that the headphones are fairly clean and efficient. Even the source impedance of the headphone amp becomes a readily manageable issue.