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1
General Audio / Re: Clipping audible when lossy encoding?
Last post by saratoga -
[...]normally inaudible integer overflow [...]
Huh? The only way for "integer overflow" to be inaudible is to not overflow.

Integer overflows are inaudible until they happen, which can make finding them quite hard if few types of inputs cause them.
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Actually ... I did not even know about this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hi-MD had a capacity for 94 minutes PCM. Brought to you by the creators of Betamax ...

But I cannot imagine industry support - rather, one would have to expect major costs fighting the RIAA back then when they tried to restrict audio-on-CD-R to very special hardware and media.

I imagine if you'd pitched that to Sony in 1996, they'd have pointed out that they could easily expand the capacity of a CD by more than 30% just by increasing the NA of the read out optics without having to spend a small fortune on semiconductors.  Remember, by the late 1990s things like GD-ROM were already commercially available with larger capacity and almost no cost premium:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GD-ROM

"considered a mistake that contributed to the Dreamcast's early demise."

Yeah ... so even in the game console world, where the drives are bundled with the machine (unlike for music) and the vendor ensures that this is how the content is delivered (unlike for music), this choice of format could ruin your business.



Timing played a role as well.  As the Nintendo GameCube could not play DVDs either.  Being the first out in a console generation and yet not utilizing the DVD format was stupid of SEGA.  It allowed Sony to gain an edge.

I think if SEGA skipped the 32X, supported the Saturn better it would've turned out better for them.

The PS3 wasn't exactly 1st place in it's generation despite being the only console to play Blurays.

Also consumer confusion can affect a business.  Nintendo was very successful with the Wii but when they went to release a new console they called it the "Wii U".

And finally the overall quality and value of a product and who it's marketed towards can determine it's success and adoption.  With a format you want as many people to adopt it as possible.  With a game console the quality of the software library and the consumer base that adopts it can affect you, not just in the present tense but also later on.
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General Audio / Re: Clipping audible when lossy encoding?
Last post by [JAZ] -
[...]normally inaudible integer overflow [...]
Huh? The only way for "integer overflow" to be inaudible is to not overflow. Any tiny amount of overflow will be clearly audible. ( ok.. maybe with white noise it could be hidden under the SNR, but otherwise... )
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Thanx @Phanton_13 I find your post really exciting! I will give a good read at your links!
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Opus / Re: Opusenc's built-in resampler
Last post by saratoga -
I sometimes find it bad since sometimes, I want to ABX Opus with another codec, but just because Opus outputs 48kHz audio, I have to go for extra measures just to resample the output of the other codec to 48kHz also.

You shouldn't resample other audio to 48k, you should resample the opus output to match the input. I am not certain, but I believe opusdec can do this automatically.
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General Audio / Re: Clipping audible when lossy encoding?
Last post by saratoga -
Is this in reference to my opus clipping remark?  If so, I was considering clipping because the artifact was described as sounding like it and the material was chiptunes, which can cause normally inaudible integer overflow or clipping bugs to suddenly become very noticeable.  A full scale square wave will often make it very clear if your processing steps need more headroom.

For software that handles things correctly, lossy induced clipping should not be audible.
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halb27, thank you for the sample harp40_1 and tests.
Let's see if devs can do something with it.
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General Audio / Re: Clipping audible when lossy encoding?
Last post by DVDdoug -
Quote
a) do I have to worry about the clipping? I guess I have to, but I'd be very pleased if somebody could convince me of the contrary. Maybe there are studies out there about it, but I've never heard of it.
I'm not worried...  When I make an MP3 I know I'm making a lossy file...  But, I expect it to sound good (if the original sounds good ;) ) ...and it always does.

Some people reduce the volume before making a lossy copy, but I don't bother.

If I want perfection, I'll go lossless.
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Opus / Re: Three new Opus releases
Last post by [JAZ] -
@OrthograficCube: If you're fine with compiling in the linux way, maybe you should try msys2  ( http://www.msys2.org/ ).
I haven't tested if opus builds in there, but there's a high chance that it will.