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MP3 / Re: best mp3 encoder with something better than a command line interface?
Last post by saratoga -
Default settings are choosen by the devlopers for a reason. If you're the kind of user who thinks posting spectrograms of mp3s is a good idea, you should probably should stick to the defaults.
Are you happy now? Check the ABX tests. The encoded sample sounds better, more vivid and selective sounds, less noise.

That is an ABX test comparing a WAV and an MP3.  Assuming the WAV is the lossless file and the MP3 is your custom compile, that shows is that your MP3 is not transparent, which is a bad thing.

I posted spectograms only to see the encoded .mp3 was not butchered by the encoder (trimmed from 20 kHz to 16 kHz), as you suggest with the default settings and so on.

A spectrogram cannot show you if a file was "butchered".  It just shows you the spectrum, which is irrelevant.  It is not impossible that you might outsmart the developers, but if you're looking at spectrograms, it is very, very unlikely.

May you tell me what is the reason the developers locked for general use the fine tuning (psychoacoustics) of lame v3.100?

Generally settings are exposed if there is a reason a user might need to change them.  For things that don't have a reason to change they're not exposed.

3
MP3 / Re: why does the file sound better
Last post by greynol -
If you were to tell me that you could discern 160kbit mp3 from the original source, I'd believe you.  An ABX test should be performed, but 160kbit mp3 is commonly accepted as non-transparent.

If you're experiencing a large jump in volume from mp3 to wave then the issue will likely be caused by the mp3 containing replaygain data and the player using this data, whereas the level correction was not employed when the wave file was played back.  This could either be that the replaygain data was discarded during the conversion or was maintained as a RIFF chunk in the wav file which was not used by the player.  It could instead/also be limiting by the OS, but I seriously doubt it.  The existence of replaygain data in the mp3 file can be determined with a proper tag editor such as mp3tag or foobar2000.  If you use foobar2000 for playback and/or conversion you can elect whether not to use this data.  I can't speak for dbpoweramp.

It's also possible, that converting mp3 to flac will retain replaygain data, which would likely mean the playback level between the two won't change.  However, it seems like the differences you're describing do not include the same change in level, in which case it's simply placebo effect.  Decoding mp3 results in the exact same audio data regardless of whether the destination format is flac or wave.

While it might feel insulting to be told you're imagining differences, placebo effect/expectation bias is quite normal.

Without a proper ABX log and audio samples (which don't exceed 30 seconds in order to help address copyright infringement) we can't really know what is really happening.
4
CD Hardware/Software / Re: EAC on Win10 - process launched, no GUI
Last post by DVDdoug -
My first preference is now CueRipper because it's easy to setup and use.    But, it seems to fail quite a bit (I forget the failure message but it just stops).    When that happens I go back to EAC.

I know this doesn't help you, but I've got EAC on at least one 32-bit Win10 system, and on a couple of 64-bit Win10 systems and it's working.
6
MP3 / Re: best mp3 encoder with something better than a command line interface?
Last post by BrilliantBob -
Default settings are choosen by the devlopers for a reason. If you're the kind of user who thinks posting spectrograms of mp3s is a good idea, you should probably should stick to the defaults.
Are you happy now? Check the ABX tests. The encoded sample sounds better, more vivid and selective sounds, less noise.

I posted spectograms only to see the encoded .mp3 was not butchered by the encoder (trimmed from 20 kHz to 16 kHz), as you suggest with the default settings and so on.

May you tell me what is the reason the developers locked for general use the fine tuning (psychoacoustics) of lame v3.100? I remember in lame v3.98 these settings was available, not locked. Commercial reasons whatever?

GiT gUd
7
MP3 / Re: why does the file sound better
Last post by tpijag -
Quote
Now if i convert from mp3 to flac, if i understand correctly the compression on the source will still take place, 'like winzip', the source in this case is mp3, whereas mp3 to wav there is no compression and sounds like the the file has been eq slightly.

At the very least, you seem to be confusing types of compression. Lossy compression such as used in creating a MP3 file by using a Psycho Acoustic Model to remove bits of audio that are likely to not be missed. [simplistic explanation].

Lossless compression - flac - as you referenced "like winzip' that removes 0 information and upon decoding is the same audio file as your wav file.

And your results, as others have tried to explain to you, is simply a possible difference in volume [perceived by most humans as better sound], something broken in what you are doing, or delusional, placebo thinking.

Continuing to tell us that you listen carefully and there are differences is pointless. Take the time to learn to volume level match your files and do a ABX test and report back.   Foobar2000 would be an easy and acceptable program to used for double blink ABX test.

8
MP3 / Re: why does the file sound better
Last post by greynol -
mp3 track will say compressed 89%
flac will say 36% compressed
whereas wave say 0 compressed
This is all about file size and nothing about quality.

[using my ears]
Your ears have clearly deceived you.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Placebo

Quote
TOS 8. All members that put forth a statement concerning subjective sound quality, must -- to the best of their ability -- provide objective support for their claims.  Acceptable means of support are double blind listening tests (ABX or ABC/HR) demonstrating that the member can discern a difference perceptually, together with a test sample to allow others to reproduce their findings.  non-blind listening tests [...] are not acceptable
Quote
You can read how to easily perform double blind listening tests here :
What is a blind ABX test ?
https://www.foobar2000.org/
https://www.foobar2000.org/components/view/foo_abx

As it stands your anecdotal evidence of what you hear is useless.

As was mentioned, peaks in mp3 files can go above 0 dBFS.  Insofar as to whether your operating system is limiting the mp3 file, this will need to be taken into account in order to perform an apples to apples to comparison.  However, peaks from mp3 files exceeding 0dBFS will result in wave files that will reach 0dBFS which can and likely will be limited as well.
9
MP3 / Re: why does the file sound better
Last post by saratoga -
Quote
Now if i convert from mp3 to flac, if i understand correctly the compression on the source will still take place, 'like winzip', the source in this case is mp3, whereas mp3 to wav there is no compression and sounds like the the file has been eq slightly.

No, you're misunderstanding.  Output is identical in both cases.

Quote
As i listen back to the track, i can hear the slight difference between the flac and wave track, as i hone in on the drums, snares and HH [ using my ears], the wave track is slightly brighter, giving better defintion to the instruments.

Are the output PCM samples actually any different?  If they are, something is going wrong, your software is performing extra processing, etc.  If you do it correctly, the output is identical.
10
MP3 / Re: why does the file sound better
Last post by doriandun -
I understand going from mp3 to wav is no different than going from mp3 to flac, if you use dbpoweramp, right click your mp3 file [cbr 160 was used] and click on convert, then using the drop down menu, select wave, add in the info i suggested, as a recap,  uncompressed 16bit(cd) , channels (2 stereo cd), 44,1khz.

Once the process is finished [converting] , if i check the file 'hover over using mouse, a window appears showing the track info.

mp3 track will say compressed 89%; - this is source which was ripped from a cd, years back
flac will say 36% compressed
whereas wave say 0 compressed

Now if i convert from mp3 to flac, if i understand correctly the compression on the source will still take place, 'like winzip', the source in this case is mp3, whereas mp3 to wav there is no compression and sounds like the the file has been eq slightly.

As i listen back to the track, i can hear the slight difference between the flac and wave track, as i hone in on the drums, snares and HH [ using my ears], the wave track is slightly brighter, giving better defintion to the instruments.

I picked a host of files ranging from rock, funk & soul and r&b, i also used spek to check the track, all the tracks still illustrated 160kps cbr around 16khz cut off.

Put the tracks on usb stick plugged then into my music rig,  and listened to them, paying attention to the dums, synth, and and other instruments.




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