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Topic: Peak audiofoolery: shaving the edge of a CD to improve sound quality (Read 1779 times) previous topic - next topic
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Peak audiofoolery: shaving the edge of a CD to improve sound quality

This is quite possibly the worst thing you will ever have seen.

Quote
Light reflections disrupt the sound

Even high-end equipment for the highest of
demands is powerless against light scatter in
CDs. Laser beams are reflected numerous
times and stray this way and that over the CD's
surfaces. This audibly affects the reproduction.
The sound loses its clarity and transparency.
The beam diffusion cannot be avoided by error
correction.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-QxLAxwxkM

Re: Peak audiofoolery: shaving the edge of a CD to improve sound quality

Reply #1
Maybe also shave off the pits and lands for a perfectly non-diffusing polycarbonate disc. Sadly that only works when the disc contains nothing but silence.
Music: sounds arranged such that they construct feelings.

Re: Peak audiofoolery: shaving the edge of a CD to improve sound quality

Reply #2
The green felt pen was too cheap now?

Actually, I clicked my way in here expecting something more boring: shaving the edge to counter for an imperfectly centered hole. That is an old "solution" to an "actual problem" ... well one that doesn't need to be solved by the user, a CD-ROM drive addresses it and limits the max speed if it senses the disc doesn't run evenly.
(Indeed, the reason why CD-ROM drives don't spin faster, is those mechanical considerations.)

Re: Peak audiofoolery: shaving the edge of a CD to improve sound quality

Reply #3
It makes coffee?   :))

Re: Peak audiofoolery: shaving the edge of a CD to improve sound quality

Reply #4
Make the edge of your CD into fine plastic blade to accidently cut yourself with.  Sharp edges are a safety hazard.  That's what you're doing with the discs with that machine.

Re: Peak audiofoolery: shaving the edge of a CD to improve sound quality

Reply #5
What an expensive looking device... There's no way anyone is actually buying these

Re: Peak audiofoolery: shaving the edge of a CD to improve sound quality

Reply #6
Same folks who buy bridges.


Re: Peak audiofoolery: shaving the edge of a CD to improve sound quality

Reply #8
I need to come up with some stupid nonsense like this and make me some cash... it seems like it's a matter of coming up with the most idiotic possible idea. Although... When it comes to the press and "influencers" needed to give the scam of the month some visibility and praise, do you think they are in on the scam and require greasing, or they are as enthusiastically clueless as the audiophool audience they cater to?

Re: Peak audiofoolery: shaving the edge of a CD to improve sound quality

Reply #9
It's in the same category as gold plated oxygen-free HDMI cables (to "improve" the definition of digital video).
It's your privilege to disagree, but that doesn't make you right and me wrong.

Re: Peak audiofoolery: shaving the edge of a CD to improve sound quality

Reply #10
Copper is more conductive than gold, so gold plating the connector surfaces is a means against corrosion. Also it is a cheap procedure, so an expensive cable is not expensive because of the gold.

Re: Peak audiofoolery: shaving the edge of a CD to improve sound quality

Reply #11
Copper is more conductive than gold, so gold plating the connector surfaces is a means against corrosion. Also it is a cheap procedure, so an expensive cable is not expensive because of the gold.

@fooball
Gold plating on cables usually outlasts the cable itself unless something damages the plating.

All connectors are plated with some kind of metal typically: nickel, silver, tin, or gold.  You can look at a site like Digi-Key or Mouser.

Oxygen-free is the real marketing scam.  Another scam is the ridiculous high price paid for a cable regardless of what it's actually plated with.

Re: Peak audiofoolery: shaving the edge of a CD to improve sound quality

Reply #12
I have 30 years of making copper rings for brazing.  Oxygen-free is what I used.
It's an extra process to remover oxygen from copper just for brazing.

X

Re: Peak audiofoolery: shaving the edge of a CD to improve sound quality

Reply #13
Doesn't matter.  Digital can't achieve better definition regardless of whether you gold-plate the connectors.
It's your privilege to disagree, but that doesn't make you right and me wrong.

Re: Peak audiofoolery: shaving the edge of a CD to improve sound quality

Reply #14
No, but the cable can last longer before you have to throw it away.



Re: Peak audiofoolery: shaving the edge of a CD to improve sound quality

Reply #17
I've stopped the video as soon as I've seen-heard "CD demagnetizer". ::)

I mean... "Demagnetizing CDs" is written on the video thumbnail, so why did you even start the video then? :P

Also, I should clarify - neither this video nor the previous one promote this garbage, but expose it as scams by showing that none of them achieve absolutely any change to the audio read from the CDs (shocking, I know).

Re: Peak audiofoolery: shaving the edge of a CD to improve sound quality

Reply #18
"Demagnetizing CDs" is written on the video thumbnail, so why did you even start the video then?
The thumbnail doesn't show in my browser because by default I block anything coming from Google on non Google sites.


Re: Peak audiofoolery: shaving the edge of a CD to improve sound quality

Reply #20
I wonder how many of these... marvels of engineering... ahem, he plans on covering.
Aside from the silly shaver and the pointless degausser, what else is there that's equally dumb?
And, yes, there's that "cd rewinder", but that's not targetted at "getting better quality". It's just... I don't even know what it is...

The guy that runs that channel is an audio geek "normie" if you can picture that.
He's doesn't fully get why all the audiophile stuff is hogwash and a pointless waste of money, but he doesn't blindly swallow everything either. He's kind of a middle of the road skeptic, or something.
He has a some concept of "this doesn't make sense, and is probably not going to work", but goes and tries anyway, and at least tells his audience if the thing doesn't work, but he's not going to blast audiophoolishness out front in a combative manner.
I guess he's kind of ironic about it, but in a subtle way.