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1
@j7n
I know exactly how the spectrograms look. I'm just curious what quality this tool assigns to each of those files.
2
Easy to ABX perfectly due to the approximate 100 mSec timing discrepancy.

I'm aware of the discrepancy. I didn't bother to sync the files because the idea is to see what quality this tool assigns to each file.

This would  work if only people could control their biases. Leaving such an obvious biasing influence in place obviously  defeats the purpose of DBTs.   If you don't fix it, it suggest  a malicious attempt to bias the tests to suit a personal agenda.

3
Easy to ABX perfectly due to the approximate 100 mSec timing discrepancy.

I'm aware of the discrepancy. I didn't bother to sync the files because the idea is to see what quality this tool assigns to each file.
4
I am using Foobar2000 as a software renderer for use with uPNP, using Linn Kinsky as a control point and it shows as 'foobar2000 Renderer', is there a way I can change this please.
5
You guys are paranoid!
Or a lot more clever and experienced than "clever" trolls think
6
That's exactly what I'm trying to do: inform myself about the technology so I can work it out for myself!
I'm not trying to be flippant here, but if you want to work it out for yourself from fundamentals you'll need to truly understand sampling theory, noise shaping and sigma delta modulation.  Most people who get thru an undergraduate degree in the sciences or math still apparently don't know enough (or can't apply the theory to practice enough) to understand the technical nuances.

As other's have said, the details of practical implementations, mastering, etc. swamp the technical differences.
7
At risk of getting my head bitten off again, here's another question that might appeal more to your reasoning:

Is there any Windows software (preferably free, or a trial version) where I can load a PCM and a DSD track simultaneously and subtract one from the other to display any difference (or NO difference!) between the two?

I can save you some work. 

If one held everything else constant, that is made them the same except for the format,  the PCM and DSD audio would be identically the same. Subtract them and you get a vanishing result.

But, in just about  every commercial case everything was not held the same, so there will almost  always be some difference that actually has nothing to do with comparing DSD to PCM. For example, commercial recordings  of music that was previously released in PCM are typically remastered. So they are different, but not because one is DSD and the other is PCM.  They are not quite the same recording.
8
Think of PCM as round earth, and DSD as flat earth. If there was a discussion of those issues, would you have a hard time taking sides?  If one is sufficiently informed about these things, that is how it would look.

That's exactly what I'm trying to do: inform myself about the technology so I can work it out for myself!
9
Soldering is not the issue. If it had come unsoldered then it would no longer work. The traces have pulled loose from the board, so you need to apply a lump of glue to keep the jack from wiggling and tearing the traces.
10
At risk of getting my head bitten off again, here's another question that might appeal more to your reasoning:

Is there any Windows software (preferably free, or a trial version) where I can load a PCM and a DSD track simultaneously and subtract one from the other to display any difference (or NO difference!) between the two?
You have to convert the DSD to PCM with a low pass filter first.  You will have the inevitable problem of finding the best alignment before subtracting.  Also if you download two files you don't know the provenance of the two files.

The short version is that the reconstruction filter for the PCM and the low pass output filter for the DSD drive most of the differences you'd see.  If the PCM is a high enough sample rate the differences will be negligible.

More details: if you take a high rate test tone PCM file (say >= 2.8224MHz), band limit it to less than 1/2 of the PCM output frequency for the PCM test tone, convert the original high rate PCM to DSD, run the DSD output filter on that to get back to high rate PCM, align the outputs with the input and subtract each output from the input (at the original high rate), then:  for PCM outputs that are lower sample rate than twice the DSD output filer cutoff you'll see more difference between them and the original test tone than between the DSD and the original test tone.  Conversely if your output sample rate is more than twice the DSD output filter cutoff you'll see a bigger difference between the DSD output and the test tone.  All of these differences are more affected by the implementation of the reconstruction filter for the PCM and the DSD output low pass filter than by whether they were ever DSD or high rate PCM.

There will also be some low level noise (below -120dBFS) in the DSD output over the audio band (say up to 30 or 40kHz) and then some rising ultrasonic noise up to the DSD output filter cutoff.  That noise will never exceed -40dBFS for SACDs and for higher rate DSD can be more negligible.