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Topic: Hardware DBTs might be easy now (Read 1779 times) previous topic - next topic

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Hardware DBTs might be easy now
Devices like this one:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/USB-8-Channel-Rela...=item415e80fa98

and some even less expensive variants could be interfaced with many of the existing software DBT/ABX programs to provide an inexpensive and effective means for doing DBTs that directly involve audio hardware.

Any software experts interested in interfacing their pre-existing software DBT software with hardware like this?

Hardware DBTs might be easy now
Reply #1
Nice! And the price is certainly right.

--Ethan
I believe in Truth, Justice, and the Scientific Method

  • ExUser
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Hardware DBTs might be easy now
Reply #2
If any of you hardware guys want to use something like this to do testing, I could whip up a quick ABX switcher in an afternoon, given the hardware design in Arnold's initial link.

There isn't much point in integrating that device with modern software ABX, short of sharing p-value calculations and maybe UI. They're completely different approaches!

I'm not sure what other features a person would want with a software front-end for these things. Switcher, UI, p-value calculations, maybe some nice PRNG like the Mersenne Twister or even importing truly random data from quantum sources or something...
  • Last Edit: 07 March, 2013, 06:09:27 PM by Canar

  • saratoga
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Hardware DBTs might be easy now
Reply #3
I'm not sure what other features a person would want with a software front-end for these things. Switcher, UI, p-value calculations, maybe some nice PRNG like the Mersenne Twister or even importing truly random data from quantum sources or something...


I was thinking of the ability to play back the same clip of audio repeatedly while swapping different relays.  That way you could use a laptop to test things like amps.

Hardware DBTs might be easy now
Reply #4
Nice! And the price is certainly right.


All you need to do is strip the ends of the speaker wire or interconnect cable, poke it into the relay connectors and tighten them down.

If you check the original Clark ABX paper there are some tricks relating to contact timing that can eliminate the possibility of clicks and pops.

Hardware DBTs might be easy now
Reply #5
I'm not sure what other features a person would want with a software front-end for these things. Switcher, UI, p-value calculations, maybe some nice PRNG like the Mersenne Twister or even importing truly random data from quantum sources or something...


I was thinking of the ability to play back the same clip of audio repeatedly while swapping different relays.  That way you could use a laptop to test things like amps.


Cool!