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  • trl_path
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EAC: Suspicious Positions
So I was just wondering what to do about "Suspicious Positions" on a rip.

I've tried two copies of the same CD on 3 different drives and keep getting sync errors on the final track, eg:

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Track 17

    Filename C:\EACRips\17. Tristeza - Marumari Remix.wav

    Suspicious position 0:00:33 - 0:00:34
    Suspicious position 0:00:38

    Peak level 97.4 %
    Extraction speed 0.3 X
    Track quality 98.2 %
    Test CRC 6DC10978
    Copy CRC 634A22B5
    Track not present in AccurateRip database
    Copy finished


I think that this may be due to the fact that the CD is very long - 1h18m47s - but I was wondering if there was anything else I should try before admitting defeat, and also whether some suspicious positions messages are better than others (ie which rip to keep).

The rips sound seem to sound okay at the positions in questions by the way.
  • Last Edit: 16 May, 2012, 04:48:55 PM by trl_path

  • DVDdoug
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EAC: Suspicious Positions
Reply #1
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So I was just wondering what to do about "Suspicious Positions" on a rip.
Usually, I'll try cleaning the CD and/or a different computer/drive.

If that doesn't help, if I can't hear the defect, I try to forget about it.  And in fact, I do forget...  I really can't remember which of my 13,000, MP3s had ripping errors. 

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and also whether some suspicious positions messages are better than others (ie which rip to keep).
It's a music CD...  The sound quality is what matters!    Several defects that you can't hear are better than one defect you can hear.
 

If I can hear the defect, I have several options -
- Borrow/buy another copy of the CD
- Buy a download
- Try an analog copy (if I don't hear the defect when playing the CD).
- If it's only one song, maybe I don't care and I can give-up on that song.
- Try to repair the audio with an audio editor.

I'll also usually make a backup copy of the CD...    Any defects in the audio will still be present (if I can't fix the sound), but the copy shouldn't get any ripping errors.  The original CD could be deteriorating, or it may have other spots that are difficult to read so that the CD gives more trouble the next time I try to play (or rip) it.    (If you are making lossless files and you have a backup of your music archive, you shouldn't need to make a new physical copy of the CD.)

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I think that this may be due to the fact that the CD is very long - 1h18m47s
It could be related to that.    The original CD spec was 74 minutes, but you can now get 74-minute or get 80-minute blank CD-Rs.  Apparently it's trickier to read/write near the outer edge, and the CD is more likely to be warped and/or get damaged near the edge.    (In case you don't know, CDs are read from the inside, out toward the edge....  The opposite of a vinyl record.)

  • trl_path
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EAC: Suspicious Positions
Reply #2
Doug,

many thanks for the comprehensive reply - it's always really useful to get details of how other people approach the "workflow" of ripping CDs.

I'll go back through the rips I've made and choose the best one - as I've said, I tried two different copies, so I don't think I'm going to get a good rip on this comp.

Thanks again.