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Topic: Best content for performing listening tests (Read 3281 times) previous topic - next topic

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  • Anakunda
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Best content for performing listening tests
HI what is the best music content (genre, style) for performing listening test, in the sense that it does expose possible audio artifacts most reliably ?
And additional question, for listening test is it suitable to apply usual DSP effects (gr.equalizer + limiter). WIth these effects the audio sound "better" for me, but not sure if they don't suppres audio artifacts too.
  • Last Edit: 27 September, 2011, 07:39:32 AM by Anakunda

  • pdq
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Best content for performing listening tests
Reply #1
Any listening test is only valid for that listener/material/codec/listening conditions etc. If you regularly listen with DSP effects then what is most valid for you is testing with your settings. This may make some artifacts less obvious, but others more so.

Different genres cause different issues with different codecs, so again test with what you listen to.

  • Anakunda
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Best content for performing listening tests
Reply #2
So Am I listenig almost everything except techno and rap. So not sure with which style should I start to come quickest to results.

  • mjb2006
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Best content for performing listening tests
Reply #3
What is the goal of your test?

  • Anakunda
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Best content for performing listening tests
Reply #4
The goal is to find some possible weakness on some kind of music (if so) for may chosen codec and encoding profile. For now I have tried a couple of songs whose sound transparent (can not abx) but this is my point: these samples I have chosen may be easy pieces for the codec. So obviously I want to test the codec on songs that will disclose most easily possilbe weakness so that I could change my codec or profile.

  • pdq
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Best content for performing listening tests
Reply #5
I applaud you for taking a scientific approach to selecting a codec, so many people do not. But are you sure you want to do this?

There is a whole training process you can go through to enable you to hear subtle problems, but once you are trained, you have made it more likely that you will hear problems in the future. Personally I worry that I might enjoy my music less in that case.

Storage space is cheap these days, so using a lossless codec is more practical now than it ever used to be. And any of the popular lossy codecs, at higher bit rates, are transparent to nearly everyone nearly all of the time, especially if they have not trained themselves to hear artifacts.

So why worry about it? Choose a recommended codec and settings and enjoy the music.

  • testyou
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Best content for performing listening tests
Reply #6
I second pdq.

The goal is to find some possible weakness on some kind of music (if so) for may chosen codec and encoding profile.


Want to be be more specific?