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Topic: DSD frequency range (Read 8669 times) previous topic - next topic

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  • botface
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DSD frequency range
Reply #25
What's to get excited about here? Why is it OK for DB1989 to say "I wager most people could detect the idiosyncratic signatures of vinyl with a minimum of fuss." but tahaa7 gets stomped on for saying "I can identify an LP-sourced file over a digital-sourced file" Aren't they both saying the same thing? Is it the difference between "wager" and "can"?

  • greynol
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DSD frequency range
Reply #26
for me, the issue at hand is the statement, "Maybe we can't hear those frequencies individually, but our ears can still feel them, and they all add up to make the warm sound."  However, I find the use of the term "every time" in the previous statement just as troubling, though perhaps an indication of a systemic problem with the vinyl and/or playback hardware if it turns out not to be placebo-based.

This is no longer up for public debate.  Further posts regarding moderation decisions will be removed and warnings will be issued.
  • Last Edit: 09 September, 2011, 11:41:30 AM by greynol
13 February 2016: The world was blessed with the passing of a truly vile and wretched person.

Your eyes cannot hear.

  • db1989
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DSD frequency range
Reply #27
What's to get excited about here? Why is it OK for DB1989 to say "I wager most people could detect the idiosyncratic signatures of vinyl with a minimum of fuss." but tahaa7 gets stomped on for saying "I can identify an LP-sourced file over a digital-sourced file" Aren't they both saying the same thing? Is it the difference between "wager" and "can"?
My statement that you quoted was in response to tahaa7’s: what I meant was that being able to identify vinyl over CD, as tahaa7 asserts, is nothing spectacular if the vinyl/needle is worn (e.g. one can hear crackles), there is some other quirk of the playback process, the sources aren’t level-matched, etc.—and simply being able to discern between the two neither implies the superiority of either one nor necessarily leads to the conclusion that the vinyl version possesses important ultrasonic frequencies (whether heard or ‘felt’).

  • botface
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DSD frequency range
Reply #28
Thanks for the clarification guys

  • krabapple
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DSD frequency range
Reply #29
SACD and DVD-A physical media both require special hardware, though at least now both can be passed digitally to an AVR for decoding (something not available when they were both being pushed as the next great thing).  SACD basically still cannot be archived digitally by consumers for networked playback, whereas DVD-A can.


Self-correction: there were some proprietary connections available (e.g. Pioneer's i-link, Denon's Denonlink) -- I even had a Pioneer setup that could do this.  But again, special hardware...  today, HDMI can handle all of them.
  • Last Edit: 09 September, 2011, 12:01:00 PM by krabapple

  • krabapple
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DSD frequency range
Reply #30
What's to get excited about here? Why is it OK for DB1989 to say "I wager most people could detect the idiosyncratic signatures of vinyl with a minimum of fuss." but tahaa7 gets stomped on for saying "I can identify an LP-sourced file over a digital-sourced file" Aren't they both saying the same thing? Is it the difference between "wager" and "can"?
My statement that you quoted was in response to tahaa7’s: what I meant was that being able to identify vinyl over CD, as tahaa7 asserts, is nothing spectacular if the vinyl/needle is worn (e.g. one can hear crackles), there is some other quirk of the playback process, the sources aren’t level-matched, etc.—and simply being able to discern between the two neither implies the superiority of either one nor necessarily leads to the conclusion that the vinyl version possesses important ultrasonic frequencies (whether heard or ‘felt’).



And, as Wombat has mentioned, LP mastering is often different enough from CD mastering to be likely to be audible.  There isn't anything special about being able to tell LPs from CDs.  There is something special about being able to tell LPs from digital copies of LPs.

  • knutinh
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DSD frequency range
Reply #31
Well I think we can definitely hear frequencies beyond 20kHz, but we may think we don't.

What makes you think so? Perhaps it is only you who think that you do because you like the idea of being able to?
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If those high frequencies exist, they will impact the warmth of the sound, that is, they will make the sound less harsh and "digital" sounding.

What makes you think so? Perhaps added high frequencies will make the sound more digital sounding?
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I have personally had experiences where I could tell the difference between the CD, which doesn't contain those frequencies, and vinyl, which does, every time.

1. Please provide evidence that vinyl generally have more precise high-frequency rendition than CD.
2. A vinyl pressing and a CD pressing are not suitable for comparing the quality of CD vs vinyl due to mastering.
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Maybe we can't hear those frequencies individually, but our ears can still feel them, and they all add up to make the warm sound.

Sounds like audiophile nonsense.

-k
  • Last Edit: 09 September, 2011, 05:17:39 PM by knutinh