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Topic: Transferring a digital file to cassette (Read 4713 times) previous topic - next topic

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  • 9876098
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Transferring a digital file to cassette
There is a wealth of information about transferring music from cassettes onto one's computer in digital form. Basically, one would attach 2 RCA plugs (red and white) into the cassette player and a ,125 inch stereo plug into the line-in port on the computer, then hit play on the cassette player as software is used to record input from the line-in port, if I understand correctly.

After a lot of searching, I've yet to find any information about transferring a digital file to a cassette. How would I do that? I know that I could merely play the music from the computer speakers while recording it with the cassette player, but I'm looking for a method that would result in higher quality- doing it like that would result in a lot of undesirable background noise.

I apologise if the answer to this is obvious; I have nearly no knowledge about things like this.

  • probedb
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Transferring a digital file to cassette
Reply #1
Do you mean take the line-out from the PC and plug it into the rec-in on your tape deck? Maybe going via an amp?

  • pdq
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Transferring a digital file to cassette
Reply #2
If ypur cassette player has RCA plugs for line out then it probably also has RCA plugs for line in. Take the same cable that you were using to copy from cassette to digital, switch the RCA plugs from line out to line in and the stereo plug from your sound card's line in to line out.

  • 9876098
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Transferring a digital file to cassette
Reply #3
Ah, that makes perfect sense. The only audio output connector on my computer is the headphone connector. I have a stereo line-in connector, but not a stereo line-out connector. Is there any way to do this without having to borrow the computer of someone else?

  • pawelq
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Transferring a digital file to cassette
Reply #4
Try the headphone connector, it should work as well or almost as well as line-out.

Make sure you don't overload the tape deck's inputs.
Ceterum censeo, there should be an "%is_stop_after_current%".

  • 9876098
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Transferring a digital file to cassette
Reply #5
What could cause the tape deck's inputs to be overloaded? How would I avoid overloading them?

  • bandpass
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Transferring a digital file to cassette
Reply #6
  • Set the PC volume control to zero.
  • Press PAUSE+RECORD on the tape deck.
  • Start the PC playing the loudest track you wish to record.
  • Increase the PC playback volume until the tape deck VU meters just lightly & occasionally touch the red.
  • Stop both devices.
System is now ready to record tracks.

  • 9876098
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Transferring a digital file to cassette
Reply #7
Thank you for all the help. I believe that I now know everything that I need to know in order to do this. Once I obtain the appropriate connector, I'll give this a whirl.

  • d_headshot
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Transferring a digital file to cassette
Reply #8
  • Set the PC volume control to zero.
  • Press PAUSE+RECORD on the tape deck.
  • Start the PC playing the loudest track you wish to record.
  • Increase the PC playback volume until the tape deck VU meters just lightly & occasionally touch the red.
  • Stop both devices.
System is now ready to record tracks.


How low is too low for decreasing the PC volume when monitoring the VU meters? A lot of music these days is so damn loud and compressed, the red is being pegged constantly so wouldn't you have to compensate for that?

  • AndyH-ha
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Transferring a digital file to cassette
Reply #9
Any given peak level on the computer should produce the same reading at the cassette deck each and every time it occurs. If 70% of a track is at 0dBfs digital, the same 70% should read at the maximum recording level you choose to use on the tape deck. For what do you want to compensate?

It is considerably easier to record from an audio editor, where the entire thing can be seen on screen before you start. Then you can easily choose a maximum level segment to play and set your tape input levels before you begin the recording.

If the player allows you to play a selected section in loop mode, zoom in to a suitable section, and select just a few seconds. Played over and over you will have a very convenient signal with which to adjust the tape input.

  • 9876098
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Transferring a digital file to cassette
Reply #10
I have one more quick question. Would I be able to do this from any device that has a headphone output, such as an MP3 player or radio?

  • trout
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Transferring a digital file to cassette
Reply #11
Yes. The type of device will typically not matter. In general, if an analog audio signal can be sent through wires to a set of ordinary headphones, then wires can just as easily be routed to the input of a recording device.


aside:
If you ever hear the phrase "the analog hole" in a discussion about copy protection or digital rights management (DRM), this is the basic method they're talking about.
  • Last Edit: 21 July, 2011, 03:04:08 AM by trout

  • 9876098
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Transferring a digital file to cassette
Reply #12
Ok, thanks for the answer to that question. I've heard of the analog hole before, but I've never needed to or known how to utilize it until now (less artists sell their music on cassettes these days). Regarding DRM and the DMCA, it's one reason to never buy (most) electronics that were manufactured in or shipped to the U.S.
  • Last Edit: 22 July, 2011, 10:52:19 PM by 9876098