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  • probedb
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Audio absurdities
Reply #50
On some Pioneer models, it would. The disc would be upside-down on a turning platter, meaning that you could not use those plastic disc clamps.

I actually heard a «disc clamp» kind of thing that made an audible difference. I mean, a «WTF?» level of difference. Never had the chance to check out the details, but I suspect there was some resonance rattling off in the player itself. (Hm ... if I had such a CD ring, I'd try the trick on my early DVD-player ...)


I didn't realise that. Wouldn't you just have a continuous scraping sound as the disc rotated on the surface it was sitting on though? Plus all that friction wouldn't be good would it?

Audio absurdities
Reply #51
Quote
The Blackbody is a high-tech audio accessory which greatly enhances your audio playback experience by addressing the interaction of your audio gear's circuitry with ambient electromagnetic phenomena and modifying this interplay. The Blackbody takes advantage of the quantum nature of particle interaction, and is therefore able to permeate metal, plastic, wood, and other barriers to affect the circuitry inside your components. This altered electromagnetic influence results in profoundly improved sound quality.


A steal at $ 959 only!
http://www.lessloss.com/blackbody-p-200.html

I this this product is based on this idea: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_body.  "A black body is an idealized physical body that absorbs all incident electromagnetic radiation. "

I doubt that this company has discovered this *idealized* (theoretical?) object and even if they had, i don't understand what possible difference it could make to the sound of my equipment.
Music lover and recovering high end audiophile

Audio absurdities
Reply #52
On some Pioneer models, it would. The disc would be upside-down on a turning platter, meaning that you could not use those plastic disc clamps.

I actually heard a «disc clamp» kind of thing that made an audible difference. I mean, a «WTF?» level of difference. Never had the chance to check out the details, but I suspect there was some resonance rattling off in the player itself. (Hm ... if I had such a CD ring, I'd try the trick on my early DVD-player ...)


I didn't realise that. Wouldn't you just have a continuous scraping sound as the disc rotated on the surface it was sitting on though? Plus all that friction wouldn't be good would it?


My first CD player (a radio shack deal back in 1986 or so) was so sensitive to vibrations that if you closed the door to my dorm room, the player would lose it's tracking (i opened it up once an found the insides of it mostly empty).  I remember that those pioneer players that you had to lay the disk upside down in were early models too. That might have been their solution to that problem and i can see a disc clamp helping with that as well.  Also, putting a CD in those things was kinda like placing a record on it's mat and might have eased the transition for people used to vinyl by making playing a CD feel similar.
Music lover and recovering high end audiophile

  • antz
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Audio absurdities
Reply #53
Quote
The Blackbody is a high-tech audio accessory which greatly enhances your audio playback experience by addressing the interaction of your audio gear's circuitry with ambient electromagnetic phenomena and modifying this interplay. The Blackbody takes advantage of the quantum nature of particle interaction, and is therefore able to permeate metal, plastic, wood, and other barriers to affect the circuitry inside your components. This altered electromagnetic influence results in profoundly improved sound quality.


A steal at $ 959 only!
http://www.lessloss.com/blackbody-p-200.html

I this this product is based on this idea: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_body.  "A black body is an idealized physical body that absorbs all incident electromagnetic radiation. "

I doubt that this company has discovered this *idealized* (theoretical?) object and even if they had, i don't understand what possible difference it could make to the sound of my equipment.

You really aren't following along are you? All that nasty electromagnetic radiation floating around ruins the sound from your megabucks sound system. This gadget absorbs it all and purifies the sound, isn't it obvious? 

  • DonP
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Audio absurdities
Reply #54
It took us a bit of time the get the story from them, but it turned out that the customer had ordered a system that he would use in his cow-stables.  At that time, the Dutch government had a (heavily) subsidized experiment for this.  Believe it or not, but the milk-production of a cow that is exposed to relaxing (mostly classical as I recall) music increases up to 3% (0.7 liters).  It also seems to be true that milk from a relaxed cow tastes better, where the music comes in again.


I do volunteer work for a public radio station.  We get a lot of people who say they play classical for the cows.

Audio absurdities
Reply #55

I this this product is based on this idea: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_body.  "A black body is an idealized physical body that absorbs all incident electromagnetic radiation. "

I doubt that this company has discovered this *idealized* (theoretical?) object and even if they had, i don't understand what possible difference it could make to the sound of my equipment.

You really aren't following along are you? All that nasty electromagnetic radiation floating around ruins the sound from your megabucks sound system. This gadget absorbs it all and purifies the sound, isn't it obvious? 

Oh, right. I'm sorry Antz.  I'll try to pay more attention next time.  I've put one of those ladybug shaped radiation absorbers on the back of my LCD monitor to absorb all the electrons that escape from it and it's been making the fonts on the screen hard to read due to an occurrence of the Helvetica Scenario coupled with Quark Induction.
Music lover and recovering high end audiophile

  • Porcus
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Audio absurdities
Reply #56
On some Pioneer models, it would. The disc would be upside-down on a turning platter, meaning that you could not use those plastic disc clamps.


I didn't realise that. Wouldn't you just have a continuous scraping sound as the disc rotated on the surface it was sitting on though? Plus all that friction wouldn't be good would it?


No: Put the disc upside down on a «turntable» platter. The platter rotates.

  • Cavaille
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Audio absurdities
Reply #57
On some Pioneer models, it would. The disc would be upside-down on a turning platter, meaning that you could not use those plastic disc clamps.


I didn't realise that. Wouldn't you just have a continuous scraping sound as the disc rotated on the surface it was sitting on though? Plus all that friction wouldn't be good would it?


No: Put the disc upside down on a «turntable» platter. The platter rotates.


I had one of those Pioneer players, a Pioneer PD-S 802. The first generation of this 'stable platter mechanism' drive would have the problem that the laser would deattach itself after some time, prompting it to fall on the  CD. My drive was a member of the second generation without this problem. Still, after only 4 years you couldn´t use the player anymore because the laser emitter had deteriorated.
  • Last Edit: 08 April, 2011, 08:05:43 AM by Cavaille
marlene-d.blogspot.com

Audio absurdities
Reply #58
On some Pioneer models, it would. The disc would be upside-down on a turning platter, meaning that you could not use those plastic disc clamps.

I actually heard a «disc clamp» kind of thing that made an audible difference. I mean, a «WTF?» level of difference. Never had the chance to check out the details, but I suspect there was some resonance rattling off in the player itself. (Hm ... if I had such a CD ring, I'd try the trick on my early DVD-player ...)


I didn't realise that. Wouldn't you just have a continuous scraping sound as the disc rotated on the surface it was sitting on though? Plus all that friction wouldn't be good would it?

The mechanism (spindle) that the disk sits on rises up and lifts the CD a few mm off the tray. So, no scraping.

  • Porcus
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Audio absurdities
Reply #59
The first generation of this 'stable platter mechanism' drive would have the problem that the laser would deattach itself after some time, prompting it to fall on the  CD.


We only said the platter was stable!