Skip to main content

Topic: Frequency response plots for Behringer MS16 needed (Read 3022 times) previous topic - next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
  • googlebot
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Frequency response plots for Behringer MS16 needed
I just bought a pair of MS16 to occasionally watch movies in my office. For this kind of usage, I did not want to spend more than their price (40€). The sound is  and considering the costs I think the speakers even have exceptional value. Still, their frequency response sounds far from flat and I think good equalization could give them a large boost. But for that I need data. The professional Behringers come with FR plots, but not this model. Can anyone help?
  • Last Edit: 18 November, 2010, 10:09:15 AM by googlebot

Frequency response plots for Behringer MS16 needed
Reply #1
I just bought a pair of MS16 to occasionally watch movies in my office. For this kind of usage, I did not want to spend more than their price (40€). The sound is  and considering the costs I think the speakers even have exceptional value. Still, their frequency response sounds far from flat and I think good equalization could give them a large boost. But for that I need data. The professional Behringers come with FR plots, but not this model. Can anyone help?


To do what you seem to want to do *best*, you need a FR curve taken in the location you wish to use the speakers.  It takes about $100 worth of hardware and software to do this.

  • googlebot
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Frequency response plots for Behringer MS16 needed
Reply #2
Of course, the FR curve at an actual listening position differs considerably from an anechoic chamber measurement. However, on average the correction of a low quality speaker according to its anechoic room measurement should be better than uncorrected, even if you make things worse for some ranges.

PS I just got confirmation, that I can borrow a ECM-8000 microphone in a week, so that I can record an impulse response with that. What would I have to do to with that file to get the inverse filter after feeding it into a convoluter?
  • Last Edit: 18 November, 2010, 11:37:56 AM by googlebot

Frequency response plots for Behringer MS16 needed
Reply #3
Of course, the FR curve at an actual listening position differs considerably from an anechoic chamber measurement. However, on average the correction of a low quality speaker according to its anechoic room measurement should be better than uncorrected, even if you make things worse for some ranges.


Most speakers are located in a half-space (infinite plane or wall),  quarter-space (infinitely tall corner)  or eighth-space (corner that ends in a floor or ceiling), etc.  If you try to correct the speaker for a full space (anechoic chamber) you will usually end up with tons of excess bass.

Quote
PS I just got confirmation, that I can borrow a ECM-8000 microphone in a week, so that I can record an impulse response with that. What would I have to do to with that file to get the inverse filter after feeding it into a convoluter?


Don't forget to use an appropriate mic preamp with phantom power to do right by that ECM8000.

  • DVDdoug
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Frequency response plots for Behringer MS16 needed
Reply #4
Quote
...so that I can record an impulse response with that. What would I have to do to with that file to get the inverse filter after feeding it into a convoluter?
You'll probably have to plot the frequency response and set your equalizer manually.

Or if you're using a computer as your A/V source, Vista and Win7 have "Room Correction" built in.  (I've never tried it.)

And, I'm not sure if your RTA (Real Time Analyzer) software will use an impulse...  I think pink noise or a swept-frequency tone are more common.  Impulses are more-frequently used to measure/capture reverberation.