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Topic: ISRCs Worldwide (Read 2958 times) previous topic - next topic

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  • MrEvanBC
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ISRCs Worldwide
I'm very curious to know if there is anyone who knows the answer to this question; I am concerned about my ISRCs, because less than half the albums I have are NOT showing ISRCs in the Metadata after rip. I use DB Poweramp, but I've also tried EAC and Foobar. If I can't find these ISRCs, I cannot legally use the songs for their intended purpose. I have left messages and send emails to the RIAA and ISRC, and have yet to get a reply from either. Basically, I need to know if I am going to be running into the missing ISRC issue regularly during upload, and also any key advice that may help me gain these missing ISRCs.

Can anyone help?

Thanks
  • Last Edit: 12 October, 2010, 01:42:36 PM by greynol

ISRCs Worldwide
Reply #1
There are lots of cd's without ISRC codes. There is no obligation to use them, they are just a convenient way to identify a piece of recorded music.
AFAIK the consumer shouldn't be bothered with ISRC codes. What is your intended purpose ?

  • db1989
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  • Global Moderator
ISRCs Worldwide
Reply #2
If there is a scenario in which one must know the ISRC of a track for some reason, I’d assume a database of ISRCs exists somewhere—one that is not reliant on their optional storage in CD subcodes—otherwise, that is a very draconian requirement.
  • Last Edit: 12 October, 2010, 01:09:36 PM by dv1989

  • MrEvanBC
  • [*]
ISRCs Worldwide
Reply #3
There are lots of cd's without ISRC codes. There is no obligation to use them, they are just a convenient way to identify a piece of recorded music.
AFAIK the consumer shouldn't be bothered with ISRC codes. What is your intended purpose ?


My intended purpose if for Internet Radio

  • MrEvanBC
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ISRCs Worldwide
Reply #4
If there is a scenario in which one must know the ISRC of a track for some reason, I’d assume a database of ISRCs exists somewhere—one that is not reliant on their optional storage in CD subcodes—otherwise, that is a very draconian requirement.


I feel the same. The question is, where? I've left messages and sent emails to ISRC and RIAA, to which I never recieved a response. I've dug through piles of misinformation via web info, with no luck. It's now becoming a thorn in my side.

  • mjb2006
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ISRCs Worldwide
Reply #5
Would it be correct to guess that you're talking about SoundExchange's requirement that webcasters regularly submit a "Report of Use"?

As stated on their web site, you have to provide "album title and marketing label OR International Standard Recording Code", not both. ISRCs aren't available for every sound recording in existence and never will be. If there is a database, it's not publicly available. I believe at present you can only find an ISRC by using software to try to read it from the subcode of CDs which happen to have them. This happens when generating a cue sheet with Exact Audio Copy, for example, so the codes (if any are present) can be included in the cue sheet.

  • greynol
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ISRCs Worldwide
Reply #6
If I were to wager a guess, fewer than one in ten of my CDs contains ISRC data, perhaps even less than one in twenty.
13 February 2016: The world was blessed with the passing of a truly vile and wretched person.

Your eyes cannot hear.

ISRCs Worldwide
Reply #7
The question is, where?
You're not the first one to ask here:
This may seem like a dumb question, but does anyone know of a ISRC-based DB publicly available on the web?
AFAIK there is no public central ISRC database. Have a look at the wikipedia info about ISRC. ISRC is rather similar to UPC and EAN codes: the first part of the code is fixed (country, client, year), the second part is a serial number which the user can use freely. There is no verification for duplicates(!) and there is no obligation (or even possibility) to publish these codes. Quote from the ISRC handbook:
Quote
4.1.5 Registration in Repertoire Databases
Whilst there is no obligation in ISO3901: 2001 to keep records (beyond those needed to ensure uniqueness), nor to register the assignment with the National Agency or any other body, there is little value in the ISRC system without such records being kept and comprehensive databases being maintained. It is therefore strongly recommended that Registrants keep good records and ensure that the details of the recording (the metadata) and the ISRC allocated, are included in relevant repertoire databases. The International ISRC Agency can provide advice on the appropriate database in particular circumstances.
[/size]It's also important to know that two tracks with identical ISRC codes can be (slightly) different audio-wise. According to the handbook, minor mastering changes like a small level change in a "best of" version don't require attribution of a new ISRC code.