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Determining WavPack version?
I am wondering, since I have not been able to find a tool to determine which version encoder a particular WavPack audio file was encoded with. I tried using Foobar, Media Info, and MP3Tag to no avail.

Does anybody know a way to determine this?

Thank you!

  • lvqcl
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Determining WavPack version?
Reply #1
wvunpack -s filename.wv

->  encoder version:  4

  • Robertina
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Determining WavPack version?
Reply #2
I had the same question as cubanresourceful, however I would like to ask additionally whether it is possible to write the used encoder version directly into a to be generated WavPack file and an appropriate APEv2 tag during the conversion process with wavpack.exe. That way foobar2000 and other programs would be able to display that information in their properties dialogs without further efforts.

I checked the WavPack parameters but didn't find what I was looking for.
This is HA. Not the Jerry Springer Show.

  • bryant
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Determining WavPack version?
Reply #3
It is possible to determine the high-order version number directly from a WavPack file (e.g., 1, 2, 3, or 4), but it is not possible to find the exact version number of the encoder. In retrospect this would have been a good idea, but I use md5 sums of the encoded files to check for regressions and so I decided not to include this because it would change the sums every revision.

To add this information to the APEv2 tag, it should be possible to just add this (or something similar)  to the command-line:

Code: [Select]
-w "version=4.60"


Determining WavPack version?
Reply #4
It is possible to determine the high-order version number directly from a WavPack file (e.g., 1, 2, 3, or 4), but it is not possible to find the exact version number of the encoder. In retrospect this would have been a good idea, but I use md5 sums of the encoded files to check for regressions and so I decided not to include this because it would change the sums every revision.

To add this information to the APEv2 tag, it should be possible to just add this (or something similar)  to the command-line:

Code: [Select]
-w "version=4.60"

That makes sense. I was aware of finding out the higher-order number, but seeing how 4.0 was first released in September 14, 2004, it would of been nice know how old my files are and maybe upgrading them haha (I know it doesn't makes sense but I think I have an OCD...).

I guess I'll wait until 5.0 comes out sometime in the future and then mass upgrade my files.  Thanks for the help bryant! And thanks to everybody else as well.

  • bryant
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Determining WavPack version?
Reply #5
That makes sense. I was aware of finding out the higher-order number, but seeing how 4.0 was first released in September 14, 2004, it would of been nice know how old my files are and maybe upgrading them haha (I know it doesn't makes sense but I think I have an OCD...).

I understand your desire to have files encoded with recent versions, but as long as you just use lossless mode there have been no changes that would make any relevant differences since the 4.0 release.

However, if you use the lossy/hybrid mode, then there have been some improvements (like the addition of the dynamic noise shaping). You can generally find out if these options were used in your files by using the -s option under "modes".

David