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Topic: Best signal for loudspeaker listening test (Read 2509 times) previous topic - next topic

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  • jlohl
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Best signal for loudspeaker listening test
It's a nice summer day, I'm driving my old car. It's hot so I open the car windows.
Wow, I can clearly hear the timbral effect of every tree I pass by ! I'm a bat !
That's amazing, I can hear the sound reflection of objects even 10 meters from the road, ...
For sure, you also have the listening performances of a bat...
But imagine that my car sounds like the Berliner Philharmoniker or Pink Floyd, would I hear the reflection of a tree ? I doubt.

Noise of a car has similarities to pink noise. Considering our capabilities with car reflections, I'm not surprised that most of listening tests have determined that pink noise is the best signal to hear timbral anomalies.

For loudspeakers testing, pink noise can give a good idea of timbre but it has no transient feature.
So my question is : are there other signals having timbral advantages of pink noise but also transients ?
I think of applause recordings but they have a timbral characteristic of the microphone used. Beach or river recordings share same problems.
To be sure that no colouration is added to the recording, we can imagine a synthetic noise having the frequency regularity of pink noise together with transient properties of applauses.
Has somebody done it ?

  • Sunhillow
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Best signal for loudspeaker listening test
Reply #1
Hi
I am sure if you would drive in a loudless car with good speakers mounted on it playing orchestral music you could also hear a timbral echo effect when passing trees, walls or poles beneath the road. No need to fear you will convert to a bat ;-)