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Topic: FLAC of Lossy Source (Read 4603 times) previous topic - next topic
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FLAC of Lossy Source

OK...  So forget about the legal issues with this...  I don't want to turn this into that sort of thread...  But I have a question...

If you have a playable CD which you know was created from a lossy source (MP3 or AAC), and you are adding it to your collection...what do you do?

Do you archive in FLAC to ensure nothing else gets lost?  Or do you just create another lossy version of it with MP3 and/or AAC?

And if you FLAC it, do you let the files get mixed in with your lossless FLACs?


FLAC of Lossy Source

Reply #1
I'd leave it the way it is..The only thing gained by going from lossy-->flac, is a bigger file...Why on earth would you even consider adding a lossy file in lossless format, to your true lossless file archive...Oi!...If you want it in flac, purchase the original CD and rip it...
Jm2.5 cents worth..

FLAC of Lossy Source

Reply #2
I'd leave it the way it is..The only thing gained by going from lossy-->flac, is a bigger file...Why on earth would you even consider adding a lossy file in lossless format, to your true lossless file archive...Oi!...If you want it in flac, purchase the original CD and rip it...
Jm2.5 cents worth..


Thanks...  I completely agree with you...

Unfortunately, I can't leave it the way it is...because it is a playable CD that was created from a lossy source (MP3 playlist burned to a playable CD)...  So now I am deciding to I rip to FLAC to preserve as much of the resulting quality...or do I encode back to MP3 or AAC which results in a file that has been compressed twice...

And this is not really a question of what should I do in this instance...  This instance did get me to thinking about what the folks on this forum would do in these sorts of cases...

FLAC of Lossy Source

Reply #3
If you're dealing with a potentially-lossy source, there really is no "best suggestion", since no matter what you do, there will be a trade-off. If the cost of storage is not an issue to you, the "safest" choice would be to rip lossless (FLAC, since this is where you're asking).

My personal suggestion would be to encode various settings with your preferred lossy codec and ABX against the CD until you find your level of transparency.

FLAC of Lossy Source

Reply #4
Before encoding to flac I would first process it in lossyWAV. This will make your flac file much smaller but should avoid the kind of artefacts you often get from going from lossy to lossy.

FLAC of Lossy Source

Reply #5
Storing a lossy file in a lossy codec reduces quality even further.  Many people archive old recordings lossy with that "it's not hi-def-anyways" attitude, but that's just not right.  On the other hand, it's bad practice to archive lossy sources and declare them as lossless, but as long as you somehow mark these folders or filenames specifically I would go with FLAC.

ff

FLAC of Lossy Source

Reply #6
Storing a lossy file in a lossy codec reduces quality even further.  Many people archive old recordings lossy with that "it's not hi-def-anyways" attitude, but that's just not right.  On the other hand, it's bad practice to archive lossy sources and declare them as lossless, but as long as you somehow mark these folders or filenames specifically I would go with FLAC.

ff


Just adding to his suggestion, maybe you can name your files songtitle.mp3.flac or songtitle.lossy.flac as a permanent reminder...

 

FLAC of Lossy Source

Reply #7
I'd suggest using the .mp3.flac or .transcode.flac double extension.

The .lossy.flac double extension is already used by lossyFLAC (i.e. the lossyWAV bit-depth reduction preprocessor used on the WAV, followed by FLAC compression).

I agree with pdq that lossyWAV is a great way to avoid excessive bitrate without traditional transcoding artifacts. The portable option is likely to give around 380 kbps. Ideally, you'd end up with a triple filename extension, such as .transcode.lossy.flac or .mp3.lossy.flac to indicate the source in case you forget one day.
Dynamic – the artist formerly known as DickD