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Portable Multitrack Digital Player
Hello everyone,

i'm looking for a portable multitrack player that can play WAV or MP3 or anythingelse to use during live performance with my band. Our aim is to play different audio track simultaneously, and split signal on different outputs. For example:
- track no 1 with metronome goes to the drummer
- track no 2 with music goes to the drummer
- track no 3 with electronic effect goes to the output cabinets

We could do it with protools or logic and an audio board but I don't want to use my powerbook on stage.

Can anyone help us??

Thnx in advance

  • loft
  • [*][*][*]
Portable Multitrack Digital Player
Reply #1
IMHO I don't think you'll find some consumer/prosumer equipment that could do that and have a reasonable price. Multitrack playback is something that very few would use and maybe is integrated only in some professional players.
I suggest thinking about the computer solution again.

  • DVDdoug
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Portable Multitrack Digital Player
Reply #2
Perhaps something like this[/color]?

Quote
We could do it with protools or logic and an audio board but I don't want to use my powerbook on stage.
  Right!  Computers are too unreliable, and there is too much potential for things going wrong.  If you're using a computer as part of a live perfomance, it should be a dedicated computer (so nothing gets changed) and you should have a backup!

  • Soulster
  • [*]
Portable Multitrack Digital Player
Reply #3
I believe this is what Logic's "Mainstage" app was created for.

  • PaJaRo
  • [*][*][*]
Portable Multitrack Digital Player
Reply #4
Perhaps something like this[/color]?

Quote
We could do it with protools or logic and an audio board but I don't want to use my powerbook on stage.
  Right!  Computers are too unreliable, and there is too much potential for things going wrong.  If you're using a computer as part of a live perfomance, it should be a dedicated computer (so nothing gets changed) and you should have a backup!

I think it won't work. It has an unique output that can be used as line or headphones.
How do u expect to send each of this tracks to a different output??

Portable Multitrack Digital Player
Reply #5
How about a cheap netbook with 4 channel output USB sound card? (http://www.emu.com/products/product.asp?product=15185)

You WILL still need a small mixer and possibly a 4 channel headphone amp.
"You can fight without ever winning, but never win without a fight."  Neil Peart  'Resist'

Portable Multitrack Digital Player
Reply #6
Hello everyone,

i'm looking for a portable multitrack player that can play WAV or MP3 or anythingelse to use during live performance with my band. Our aim is to play different audio track simultaneously, and split signal on different outputs. For example:
- track no 1 with metronome goes to the drummer
- track no 2 with music goes to the drummer
- track no 3 with electronic effect goes to the output cabinets


There's a whole product category called "portable multitrack recorders" or "portable multchannel recorders".  They are widely used by video producers.

Here's an example:

http://www.coffeysound.com/product.php?cat...p;productid=802

Quote
We could do it with protools or logic and an audio board but I don't want to use my powerbook on stage.


If you did it with Audition and a PC then you could use a windows laptop instead, and save lots of money and have better software.

Portable Multitrack Digital Player
Reply #7
Perhaps something like this[/color]?

Quote
We could do it with protools or logic and an audio board but I don't want to use my powerbook on stage.
  Right!  Computers are too unreliable, and there is too much potential for things going wrong.  If you're using a computer as part of a live perfomance, it should be a dedicated computer (so nothing gets changed) and you should have a backup!


You're joking, right?

Computers are widely used as multimedia players for all kinds of live events. Even churches routinely use computers for worship, which often includes graphics, video, and audio in the same service.

  • DVDdoug
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Portable Multitrack Digital Player
Reply #8
Quote
You're joking, right?

Computers are widely used as multimedia players for all kinds of live events. Even churches routinely use computers for worship, which often includes graphics, video, and audio in the same service.
No, I'm not joking!

Think about how often you have a computer problem compared to how often you have a problem with a mixer, or guitar amp.  Things things usually go for years without any problems...  (Microphone cables fail once in a while, but I'll bet you carry spares.)  Computers never go that long without some problems.  Computers are less reliable than almost any  piece of audio equipment...  Of course, most of these problems are software related or caused by the user, but that's not the point.  And, even a minor problem that takes 10 minutes to fix is a BIG problem during a live performance. 

It's one thing if you have a dedicated A/V computer, and a back-up system.  But, if you bring your home PC or you drag the computer over from the church office, you are asking for trouble.    Most amateurs and part-time professionals don't have the luxury of a dedicated computer and a backup.  From what the OP said about his Powerbook, I'm assuming that he/she doesn't want to dedicate a computer. 

And many small acts don't have a sound man, so the musician(s) ends-up runnning sound (and computer) along with setting-up and performing...

It also depends on if the computer is "mission critical" for the "performance".  Most church services can continue if some part (or all) of the technology fails.  If the computer is used to enhance the performance, that's OK.  If a computer glitch can shut down the show, that's a problem!

I LOVE COMPUTERS, and I love the things they allow me to do with audio/video... things I couldn't do otherwise.  But I also know the frustration they can cause, especially when you're under time-pressure.

P.S.
I suppose I'm paranoid!  I occasionally do DJ gigs, and I carry enough extra equipment that any piece of equipment can fail, and it won't completely shut me down.  (Except I don't have a generator, so a power failure could do it.)
  • Last Edit: 18 August, 2009, 02:13:49 PM by DVDdoug

Portable Multitrack Digital Player
Reply #9
Quote
You're joking, right?

Computers are widely used as multimedia players for all kinds of live events. Even churches routinely use computers for worship, which often includes graphics, video, and audio in the same service.


No, I'm not joking!

Think about how often you have a computer problem compared to how often you have a problem with a mixer, or guitar amp.  Things things usually go for years without any problems...  (Microphone cables fail once in a while, but I'll bet you carry spares.)  Computers never go that long without some problems.  Computers are less reliable than almost any  piece of audio equipment...  Of course, most of these problems are software related or caused by the user, but that's not the point.  And, even a minor problem that takes 10 minutes to fix is a BIG problem during a live performance. 


I actually have far more broken mic cables than just about anything else. Of course I have dozens and dozens of them running thousands of linear feet of them in play.

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It's one thing if you have a dedicated A/V computer, and a back-up system.


That is of course what everybody with a brain and the resouurces to do so, does. Our installed AV computers generally are completely isolated, dedicated, purpose-built, and all that good stuff. We have one exception that is the pastor's laptop, and it has caused more pain and hassle than all the rest put together. Did I ever tell you the story about an evening service during the week that happened to coincide with when the virus scanner was supposed to run?



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But, if you bring your home PC or you drag the computer over from the church office, you are asking for trouble.


Don't do that!

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Most amateurs and part-time professionals don't have the luxury of a dedicated computer and a backup.


Those aren't luxuries in this game.

Quote
From what the OP said about his Powerbook, I'm assuming that he/she doesn't want to dedicate a computer.


His gun, his bullet, his foot.

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And many small acts don't have a sound man, so the musician(s) ends-up runnning sound (and computer) along with setting-up and performing...


If you want to play the game, you have to pay for the equipment to do so. Every good carpenter worth his salt should be able afford at least one good hammer.

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It also depends on if the computer is "mission critical" for the "performance".  Most church services can continue if some part (or all) of the technology fails.


Been there, done that (pastor's non-dedicated computer).

Quote
If the computer is used to enhance the performance, that's OK.  If a computer glitch can shut down the show, that's a problem!


Houston, we have a problem...


Quote
I LOVE COMPUTERS, and I love the things they allow me to do with audio/video... things I couldn't do otherwise.  But I also know the frustration they can cause, especially when you're under time-pressure.

P.S.
I suppose I'm paranoid!  I occasionally do DJ gigs, and I carry enough extra equipment that any piece of equipment can fail, and it won't completely shut me down.  (Except I don't have a generator, so a power failure could do it.)


I don't do that many portable gigs. We have had a power outage at church and did bring in a generator to run the two most mission-critical parts of the operation - the sump pump, and the AV equipment.