Skip to main content

Topic: How Good Can Vinyl Sound? (Read 62913 times) previous topic - next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
  • 2Bdecided
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Developer
How Good Can Vinyl Sound?
Reply #100
The driver works at 24bit. WL6 recorded at 64bit float; digital riaa, editing clicks, and normalization. overkill? yes. 32bit float would be fine.
I see - so 24 > 64 > process > 64 > 24. That makes sense.

Certainly for some processing floating point is entirely justified simply on the grounds of convenience - you don't have to worry about peak level or clipping. I agree 64 vs 32 seems somewhat esoteric, though if you think every one of the final 24 bits is vitally important, then mathematically you can make some argument for 64-bit. Hardly relevant in this universe with human ears, but...!

Cheers,
David.

How Good Can Vinyl Sound?
Reply #101
So vinyl doesn't sound good unless it has only a massive dynamic range?
No, but low dynamic range masks the imperfections of the format and does not provide a full picture of what your equipment is truly capable of.



How low does dynamic range have to be in order to *unmask* the imperfections of the medium and the equipment?

  • ExUser
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Read-only
How Good Can Vinyl Sound?
Reply #102
How low does dynamic range have to be in order to *unmask* the imperfections of the medium and the equipment?
Well, it'd be nice if we could hear the noise of the equipment instead of just the noise of the percussion. Some "silence" would be great.

How Good Can Vinyl Sound?
Reply #103
How low does dynamic range have to be in order to *unmask* the imperfections of the medium and the equipment?
Well, it'd be nice if we could hear the noise of the equipment instead of just the noise of the percussion. Some "silence" would be great.


I have some unmodulated groove needledrops, and some straight silence. The problem is, the setup is not optimal yet. i have to rewire something I overlooked first.

How Good Can Vinyl Sound?
Reply #104
How low does dynamic range have to be in order to *unmask* the imperfections of the medium and the equipment?
Well, it'd be nice if we could hear the noise of the equipment instead of just the noise of the percussion. Some "silence" would be great.


I have some unmodulated groove needledrops, and some straight silence. The problem is, the setup is not optimal yet. i have to rewire something I overlooked first.


I'd like to see some samples of them. When you get everything right, they'd be a good reference for showing what progress you have made...

How Good Can Vinyl Sound?
Reply #105
RT posted a very interesting read:

Quote
Tracking paper available for free
I'm not dead!

I've uploaded my tracking simulation paper here. It is not the same PDF as what you would download from aes.org; an added footnote to the paper reads:
This is a revised version of the preprint presented at the 127th AES convention in October 2009, and available from the AES. That preprint remains the authoritative version of this text. Here, the copyrighted AES logo and other convention livery are removed, but the contents of the paper are unmodi ed.
  • Last Edit: 27 February, 2013, 12:50:53 PM by db1989

How Good Can Vinyl Sound?
Reply #106
Here is how a proper loading circuit should look:


The 47K is the standard load, at least for MM cartridges.  C1 is to absorb any radio frequency signal that gets on the line and should not affect the audio frequency response.


I know this is an old thread, but the above is in error and may mislead people surfing the HA archives.

C1 changes the resonant frequency of the LC network formed by the inductance of the cartridge pickup coil and its total capacitive load.

This is a series LC network, so the resonance being changed is a series resonance which is a null.

The effect of changing this capacitor varies with the particular cartridge involved. It can range from moot to very significant.

IME just about every Shure cartridge is sensitive to tuning this capacitor's value, and every Grado cartridge I've tried didn't care.

The recommended way to tune it is to tune it for best frequency response as measured on the frequency response test band(s) of a good test record.