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Topic: Simple Hearing Test (Read 74503 times) previous topic - next topic
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Simple Hearing Test

I just came across this little hearing test.  It's fairly simple if you want to give it a try. I only started to hear the test tone when the voice-over said "15 kHz". I was wondering what is the max frequency that others hear?

I'm 48 y.o. BTW.

http://audiocheck.net/audiotests_frequencycheckhigh.php

Simple Hearing Test

Reply #1
I heard 19k (    I had no idea i could hear that high) in my left ear and 18k in my right one.

Simple Hearing Test

Reply #2
I heard 19k (    I had no idea i could hear that high) in my left ear and 18k in my right one.


Hi jm, If you don't mind revealing - what is your age?


Edit : No need, I just checked your birthdate in your profile. You're only 18 y.o.


Simple Hearing Test

Reply #4
I prefer not to take this test. It will ruin my mood for a day at least.


Simple Hearing Test

Reply #6
I don't know if it's because I'm only 19, or my laptop's crummy soundcard or my crappy 3 year old iPod stock headphones, but I could hear all the frequencies from right at the beginning.

And from what I can tell, the sound doesn't start until he starts to say the word "two" in twenty-two.




I did the low one as well, but I couldn't hear until about halfway between the 20Hz and 30Hz. But that could be the crappy 'phones fault.


Simple Hearing Test

Reply #8
Woohoo! 16kHz (17 maybe). Age = 43.

Cheers, Slipstreem. 

Simple Hearing Test

Reply #9
How could I find out if my card is resampling? It's an inbuilt thingy in a Toshiba A30-303 laptop.

Simple Hearing Test

Reply #10
Quote
don't blame your speakers too quickly. Unlike low frequencies, high frequencies are easily reproduced, even with cheap speakers. In this test, the weakest components in your audio system are your ears.


That's from the first paragraph of that page. Then, on the last paragraph

Quote
Beware: cheap sound cards may have trouble reproducing the highest frequencies of this test. At best, they won't reproduce anything. At worst, ghost frequencies will be generated in the audible range. These frequencies are not representative of the file's contents! If you hear strange ups and downs or anything else that does not sound like a continuously descending sweep, suspect this test to be corrupted by aliasing (the scientific name to this phenomenon).


This *is* important. I've heard sometimes some tests that caused troubles like the ones described in there.


Just for completeness, i heard from 17Khz down (i'm 28, so i'm going down already  )

Edit: I actually hear from somewhere between 18Khz and 17Khz. Did the mosquito test too, and can hear it. (although i have to put the volume up a bit)

Simple Hearing Test

Reply #11
That's a bad choice to offer the sample at 44 kHz speed.


Simple Hearing Test

Reply #13
??? I can hear the sound right fom the beginning ???

1: I am 30 year old
2: my CPU fan is noisy (I thought it would mask it)
3: I can hear it right from the speaker I didn't even focus or used my headphones like I do when I ABX hard sample sometimes.

I never did such a test for myself so I am very surprised specially because of my age.

I recall I did a test like this when I did my military service ... the game was to guess if the sound was coming from the right, left, both or none ... guessing from the mood of the military guy behind the glass I thought I won the game at that time

Is it normal from a medical point of view to be able to listen to 22Khz noise at 30 year old ? personnaly I was expecting 19-20Khz as I knew I was not deaf ... but I right now am very surprised by my ears myself ... thks for the link 

Simple Hearing Test

Reply #14
Mmm.... there's also a test for decibels

http://audiocheck.net/testtones_dynamic.php

This one reproduces pink noise at full scale, followed by pink noise x dB's lower (so it's a good test to not fake it).

Playing at full volume (with this laptop) with the headphones i can hear down to the 72dB one (probably more), although at the usual volume i listen, i couldn't hear the 66dB one.

Simple Hearing Test

Reply #15
I don't know if it's because I'm only 19, or my laptop's crummy soundcard or my crappy 3 year old iPod stock headphones, but I could hear all the frequencies from right at the beginning.

And from what I can tell, the sound doesn't start until he starts to say the word "two" in twenty-two.


Yeah I looked at the waveform in an editor and that's exectly where it starts, it's just after the word twenty and exactly at the begining of the word two. You must be part bat AliL


Oh dear, so far at 15Khz I'm the lowest

One good thing though, I don't have to worry about the default low pass filter settings in my lame -V3 encodes

Actually that was one of the reasons I did the test. I took the the original wave file and then I encoded it with my normal settings (lame3.98 -V3) and then decoded it back to wav. Then I did the test, first on original wav file and then on the decoded mp3 file. In a wav editor I could clearly see that the first few seconds of the tone had completely vanished in the decoded mp3 file, it only started 18kHz for this waveform. But for me it made absolutely no difference, it was a good 2.5 to 3 seconds after the tone kicked in (at 18k) before I could hear it in either case. Phew, what a relief

Simple Hearing Test

Reply #16
One good thing though, I don't have to worry about the default low pass filter settings in my lame -V3 encodes
I had similar thoughts, hence why I'm so happy. I encode everything with LAME at -V3, and the lowpass filter imposed at this setting has very nearly no effect on what I hear. It's conveniently confirmed for me that, in that respect at least, I've chosen exactly the right setting for me personally for maximum compression efficiency. 

Cheers, Slipstreem. 

Simple Hearing Test

Reply #17
Is it normal from a medical point of view to be able to listen to 22Khz noise at 30 year old ?


Did you hear the frequency going up, or down, when playing  22, 21, 20, 19, 18?
I ask this, because as I said above, (and is briefly explained in the test page), The hardware can play a role here, and most often than not, listening with speakers and with AC-07 soundcards, what you hear are in fact aliasing sounds and ressonances, rather than the real tone.

You could start trying with the headphones and see if you can also hear it, but the soundcard could still have an effect.
To avoid it, play the sample that benski posted instead of the one in the website.

Simple Hearing Test

Reply #18
I downloaded the file and was clearly able to hear at 17kHz (using some basic earphones).
When I moused over the download link though I could hear it right from the start.  I suspect that all playback routes are not equal.

I'll have to test later with a quieter environment and better speakers.

Simple Hearing Test

Reply #19
blah ... it's only 17Khz with benski's file ... you ruined my day

Simple Hearing Test

Reply #20
I'll have to test later with a quieter environment and better speakers.

As was said earlier, speakers/headphones are not likely to make any difference, nor is the environment provided that you have you're playing back at normal levels for that environment.  The tones in this sample are extremely loud.

Simple Hearing Test

Reply #21
I've seen cheap integrated CODECs in older motherboards and laptops that can't even play 48000 samples-per-second material. The page describes what exactly you should hear: a clean sine wave slowly decreasing in frequency. If you hear multiple tones going up and down, the test has failed.

Simple Hearing Test

Reply #22
18.5 kHz @ 27 years.

Simple Hearing Test

Reply #23
somewhere between 21 and 22kHz and now I have a monster headache  (28 years old)