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QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Well I've installed it and it appears to let you select VBR for any bitrate, not just 96-110 , 128-146 when encoding AAC using quicktime player. I can't really tell if it sounds any good though until my Etys get here.

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #1
Isn't there supposed to be a new version of iTunes in the Leopard preview as well?

Notice any differences? A major overhaul of iTunes (iTunes 7?) in a major overhaul of the underlying OS would be the ideal time to introduce things like HE-AAC support for instance...
Every night with my star friends / We eat caviar and drink champagne
Sniffing in the VIP area / We talk about Frank Sinatra
Do you know Frank Sinatra? / He's dead

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #2
Isn't there supposed to be a new version of iTunes in the Leopard preview as well?

Notice any differences? A major overhaul of iTunes (iTunes 7?) in a major overhaul of the underlying OS would be the ideal time to introduce things like HE-AAC support for instance...


If Apple are really serious about the iPhone they're going to have to support HE-AAC pretty soon for 3gpp support.

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #3
Isn't there supposed to be a new version of iTunes in the Leopard preview as well?

Notice any differences? A major overhaul of iTunes (iTunes 7?) in a major overhaul of the underlying OS would be the ideal time to introduce things like HE-AAC support for instance...


They usually don't update iTunes in tandem with OS updates, so the iTunes in Leopard is just the current one. QT is said to have received a rather major update though.

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #4
They usually don't update iTunes in tandem with OS updates, so the iTunes in Leopard is just the current one. QT is said to have received a rather major update though.

I know, usually. But now read this.


For iTunes to play HE-AAC, Quicktime is the component that needs updating. You might see changes to iTunes to reflect the major changes in QT and you might not. That's why I'm asking.
Every night with my star friends / We eat caviar and drink champagne
Sniffing in the VIP area / We talk about Frank Sinatra
Do you know Frank Sinatra? / He's dead

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #5


They usually don't update iTunes in tandem with OS updates, so the iTunes in Leopard is just the current one. QT is said to have received a rather major update though.

I know, usually. But now read this.


For iTunes to play HE-AAC, Quicktime is the component that needs updating. You might see changes to iTunes to reflect the major changes in QT and you might not. That's why I'm asking.


Well, as per online reports, Leopard includes iTunes 6.0.5 (current one). Whether or not the new QT includes HE-AAC I do not know. In any case, QT has often been updated with new features while iTunes hasn't. AAC VBR for instance, was long available in QT before they updated iTunes to take advantage of this. If the developer preview included HE-AAC I guess we'd hear about it by now. But it could of course be one of the new "secret" features 

It'd be interesting if someone could post some new Leopard encodes of the problem sample you linked to though

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #6
Quote
It'd be interesting if someone could post some new Leopard encodes of the problem sample you linked to though


http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index....showtopic=47540

Also I just tested an HE-AAC file and it didn't seem to work...(played as 22khz, mono)

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #7
In any case, QT has often been updated with new features while iTunes hasn't. AAC VBR for instance, was long available in QT before they updated iTunes to take advantage of this.


Hhmm, I didn't know that.
Every night with my star friends / We eat caviar and drink champagne
Sniffing in the VIP area / We talk about Frank Sinatra
Do you know Frank Sinatra? / He's dead

 

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #8
Hmm, maybe I can clarify something.

First of all, Apple AAC codec along with other audio codecs are shipped as a component in Mac OS X, i.e., /System/Library/Components/AudioCodecs.component. Hence, its updates or releases are always tied up with those of Mac OS X. QuickTime and iTunes are just applications using the same AAC codec in Mac OS X. Their updates don't have a direct relationship with AAC codecs'. With the help of the SDK shipped with Mac OS X, everyone can develop his/her own applications using APIs to access Apple AAC codec, just like QuickTime or iTunes does. People can also use the command line tool, afconvert (built from /Developer/Examples/CoreAudio/Services/AudioFileTools/AudioFileTools.xcodeproj) to freely access the AudioCodecs (including AAC of course) to encode their favorite tracks.

A new AAC codec in Leopard (Mac OS X 10.5) is previewed in WWDC'06, as you have observed through QuickTime 7.2 (BTW, it's not 6.2). However, since it's just a preview, you can expect its performance, UI appearance in its applications or available features will be different in the final release whch is scheduled to due in the next spring.

You may also notice that FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec) also becomes available in the Leopard preview... not sure any application in the Leopard preview is using it though. However, you can certainly access it via APIs or the command line tool, afconvert.

Hope this helps.

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #9
You may also notice that FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec) also becomes available in the Leopard preview... not sure any application in the Leopard preview is using it though. However, you can certainly access it via APIs or the command line tool, afconvert.

Hope this helps.

FLAC support natively built into OS X? Am I reading this right? If so, it would be a boon to a lot of developers and users who have been seeking Macintosh FLAC supporting apps. Say it is so... Does Josh know about this? More info if you have it to confirm this feature please...

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #10
I heard that FLAC support in Quicktime was just demo'ed at WWDC.

Josh

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #11
That's great news Josh! I am so glad to see FLAC being recognized by larger companies (AOL wants FLAC natively in WinAmp, Apple now in Leopard, who's next Microsoft?). Keep up the good work Josh! FLAC 1.1.2 has been out now for almost 19 months (early Feb. 2005), and it has taken awhile, but the momentum is now building. Hopefully you can work with the WinAmp developers over their GPL issue to get FLAC included natively in WinAmp soon. Keep us updated on FLAC's progress please.

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #12
Is there anyway to run two instances of iTunes or Quicktime simultaneously?

Specifically I want to convert FLAC to iTunes AAC, but using two processes in order to make full use of my dual core CPU.

Is there anyway this can be done?

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #13
Is there anyway to run two instances of iTunes or Quicktime simultaneously?

Specifically I want to convert FLAC to iTunes AAC, but using two processes in order to make full use of my dual core CPU.

Is there anyway this can be done?


Use Max instead of iTunes to do the conversion. They both actually use Quicktime to do the conversion so are using the same codecs underneath. Max will automatically spawn as many encoding threads as they are processors in your machine. You can also set the number of threads manually if you wish I think.

http://sbooth.org/Max/


QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #15
Do you really need Apple AAC?

If not, try foobar with Nero AAC.

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #16
Do you really need Apple AAC?

If not, try foobar with Nero AAC.

I like using iTunes AAC, it seems to be pretty good quality.

From my testing, running two instances of NeroAAC via Foobar is about the same speed as one instance of iTunes AAC.

Well it is very marginally faster. I get about 20X real time running two instances of NeroAAC (10 times real time X 2 cores). Whereas iTunes AAC runs on my PC at around 18 - 19X.

Hence what I'd love is some way to run two instances of iTunes, so that I get 35 - 40 x real time.

Hopefully FLAC support will be integrated directly into iTunes, and the Quicktime encoder that iTunes calls will be modified in some way to be able to convert 2 songs at a time.

I mean rather than spending a heap of time optimising the encoder, it seems like a fast way to speed up the encoder is to simply let it create two instances to make use of dual core machines.


QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #18

Forgot to mention I'm on Windows...


In that case you need Foobar 2000 and iTunesEncode (which is downloadable from rarewares).

Since only one instance of iTunes can run at a time, it is impossible to get Foobar to encode more than one file at a time, which means it only makes use of one core.

In fact, I have found it necessary to set the affinity of Foobar2000 to one core, else Foobar tries to send two FLACs to iTunes, which results in an error. Something like "can not flush file"...

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #19
Guys, don't forget that this thread is about VBR AAC encoding with QuickTime 6.2 in Leopard (Mac OS X).
I suggest you post Foobar2000, NeroAAC, iTunesEncode and other Windows-application related support questions in a different thread! 

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #20
Guys, don't forget that this thread is about VBR AAC encoding with QuickTime 6.2 in Leopard (Mac OS X).
I suggest you post Foobar2000, NeroAAC, iTunesEncode and other Windows-application related support questions in a different thread! 

Since we're pseudo-modding anyway...

Could a mod perhaps change the topic title to state "Quicktime 7.2" instead of 6.2. Quicktime 7.2 is the version in Leopard while Quicktime 6.2 is over three years old.
Every night with my star friends / We eat caviar and drink champagne
Sniffing in the VIP area / We talk about Frank Sinatra
Do you know Frank Sinatra? / He's dead

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #21
Since only one instance of iTunes can run at a time, it is impossible to get Foobar to encode more than one file at a time, which means it only makes use of one core.

In fact, I have found it necessary to set the affinity of Foobar2000 to one core, else Foobar tries to send two FLACs to iTunes, which results in an error. Something like "can not flush file"...


Ah you want Windows and QuickTime AAC and SMP...you are out of luck them. On Mac OS Apple foot the licensing bill for the MPEG LA patents needed for MPEG Video and Audio encoding for all third party applications. Obviously Apple don't want to do this for Windows, therefore the codecs are only available to thirdparty applications on payment of a license fee to MPEG LA and receipt of a key from Apple to access the functionality.

This is why iTunesEncode was written in the first place as a gross hack to access the QuickTime AAC encoder without needing to pay a license fee to get at it via the QuickTime API. If you want to encode to AAC on Windows then the best route is probably the free Nero Digital encoder which is a standalone commandline executable of which you can run as many copies as you wish.

Presumably Ahead have paid the millions of dollars or whatever the extortionate fee is for a blanket license for all "shipped" copies of the encoder.

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #22
If you want to encode to AAC on Windows then the best route is probably the free Nero Digital encoder which is a standalone commandline executable of which you can run as many copies as you wish.

Presumably Ahead have payed the millions of dollars or whatever the extortionate fee is for a blanket license for all "shipped" copies of the encoder.

I believe they (Nero) have a blanket MPEG 4 patent license, and wrote the AAC code and MPEG video code the use themselves to avoid having to pay any additional royalties (other than the patent fees). Since Nero owns it owns code, it shouldn't have to pay someone else to use their copyrighted code for an encoder/decoder. At least that's what I believe, unless someone from Nero can correct me on this and edify us on their ownership of the AAC and MPEG 4 encoder/decoder code for audio and video.

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #23
Wow, great news on FLAC support in Leopard!

Since no one mentioned it, I assume no other Xiph format (like Vorbis and Theora) works under Leopard. Is my assumption right?
Join //spreadopenmedia.org to promote Vorbis, FLAC, Speex, etc

QuickTime 6.2 (in Leopard)

Reply #24
>I believe they (Nero) have a blanket MPEG 4 patent license, and wrote the AAC code and MPEG video

There is an upper cap for MPEG 4 royalties of $250,000, this allows Apple and Nero to effectively give encoders away for 'free'.

 
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