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  • PatchWorKs
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VideoLAN might disappear !
During the night of 22nd to 23rd December 2005, while everybody is preparing for Christmas, the French Parliament will rule about the "DADVSI" law. This vote will be made with minimal discussion, as an "emergency" has been declared on this law.

This law is the French transcription of the european EUCD (European Union Copyright Directive) text, which itself comes from the american DMCA (Digital Millenium Copyright Act).
The main goal of this law is to restrict the rights of digital content purchasers. It most notably forbids them from working around technical content protection measures.
Doing so, writing or publishing software allowing to do so, or even merely talking about ways to do so becomes an offence that can be punished with three years in jail.

VideoLAN is directly impacted, most notably for its DVD reading capability (all Linux DVD reading software has the same problem). Should this law be passed, this would seriously hinder VLC's development.

The french website eucd.info collects a large number of related articles and documentation
  • Last Edit: 04 December, 2005, 10:04:04 AM by PatchWorKs

  • kritip
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VideoLAN might disappear !
Reply #1
Fingers crossed nothing comes of it, that would really be a big problem! VLC is my main movie player on both my Linux, and Windows boxes!


Kristian

VideoLAN might disappear !
Reply #2
Quote
Fingers crossed nothing comes of it, that would really be a big problem! VLC is my main movie player on both my Linux, and Windows boxes!


Kristian
[{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]


DeCSS, DVDDecryptor, now VideoLAN!
Can't they just remove the code? It's not illegal to play UNencrypted DVD, afaik.

The ultimate solution, is for someone to run the sourceforge project's system on the anonymous proxy network, Tor:
[a href="http://tor.eff.org/]http://tor.eff.org/[/url]

Sourceforge for Win32 systems:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/sfsetup

the project's homepage:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/alexandria/
sourceforge source code:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/alexandria-dev/

  • Lyx
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VideoLAN might disappear !
Reply #3
Quote
The ultimate solution, is for someone to run the sourceforge project's system on the anonymous proxy network
[a href="index.php?act=findpost&pid=347612"][{POST_SNAPBACK}][/a]

Thats what will happen sooner or later. Its just that the stakes arent high enough yet. Once devs begin to be jailed for writing useful software or being seriously hindered in it, more and more devs will just relocate to anonymous networks.
I am arrogant and I can afford it because I deliver.

  • rjamorim
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VideoLAN might disappear !
Reply #4
"VideoLAN might disappear"

Ohhh, what a surprise. These guys are throwing activism and apocalyptical threats again.

Sickening
Get up-to-date binaries of Lame, AAC, Vorbis and much more at RareWares:
http://www.rarewares.org

VideoLAN might disappear !
Reply #5
btw, sf's project system wouldn't be easy on tor - it's closed source and expensive

i hope you all appreciate the irony in that.
  • Last Edit: 17 January, 2007, 01:34:50 PM by ...Just Elliott
err... i'm not using windows any more ;)

  • eofor
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VideoLAN might disappear !
Reply #6
"VideoLAN might disappear"


It won't disappear, this only means that they might have to pay licensing fees like everyone else (QuickTime, Nero, Winamp, WMP, WinDVD, etc). What they're doing now is akin to standing on the streets handing out free photocopied chapters of "The Da Vinci Code", telling people "it's your responsibility to find out if this is illegal here, if it is you should contact the publishers yourself to make arrangements".

  • abasher
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VideoLAN might disappear !
Reply #7
It won't disappear, this only means that they might have to pay licensing fees like everyone else (QuickTime, Nero, Winamp, WMP, WinDVD, etc). What they're doing now is akin to standing on the streets handing out free photocopied chapters of "The Da Vinci Code", telling people "it's your responsibility to find out if this is illegal here, if it is you should contact the publishers yourself to make arrangements".

Isn't it more like allowing you to read your legal copy of the book without buying de-scrambling glasses which just doesn't come in you choice of style?

  • MedO
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VideoLAN might disappear !
Reply #8
It won't disappear, this only means that they might have to pay licensing fees like everyone else (QuickTime, Nero, Winamp, WMP, WinDVD, etc). What they're doing now is akin to standing on the streets handing out free photocopied chapters of "The Da Vinci Code", telling people "it's your responsibility to find out if this is illegal here, if it is you should contact the publishers yourself to make arrangements".


They can't pay license fees afaik, because open source projects won't get a license. Also, the fees are paid per shipped unit or something, which is kind of impossible to do with F/OSS. At least I think I read this stuff somewhere...

  • Gabriel
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  • Developer
VideoLAN might disappear !
Reply #9
They can't pay license fees afaik, because open source projects won't get a license. Also, the fees are paid per shipped unit or something, which is kind of impossible to do with F/OSS. At least I think I read this stuff somewhere...

I personally don't understand why an open source project would not be able to get an mpeg license. Beeing willing to do it is another problem.
But codecs licenses is not the object of this topic, which btw is 1 year old.

  • MedO
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VideoLAN might disappear !
Reply #10

They can't pay license fees afaik, because open source projects won't get a license. Also, the fees are paid per shipped unit or something, which is kind of impossible to do with F/OSS. At least I think I read this stuff somewhere...

I personally don't understand why an open source project would not be able to get an mpeg license. Beeing willing to do it is another problem.
But codecs licenses is not the object of this topic, which btw is 1 year old.


I meant the license to decode CSS. Maybe I'm confusing something here though.

  • eofor
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VideoLAN might disappear !
Reply #11
I meant the license to decode CSS. Maybe I'm confusing something here though.


According to the CCA FAQ you can get CSS licenses in Open Source projects. Like MPEG licensing, it's a matter of choice. Although VLC might get away with it (they're most likely too small to be sued), VLC are a bit naive if they think they can continue forever to base the product on the free use of patented technology, while all competitors are paying up. The legal limbo can't be there forever so at some point, they're going to have to go legit or "go underground".
  • Last Edit: 18 January, 2007, 09:41:53 AM by eofor

  • Gabriel
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  • Developer
VideoLAN might disappear !
Reply #12
I meant the license to decode CSS. Maybe I'm confusing something here though.

Yes, if talking about the CSS license, you are right. It's not possible to obtain a CSS license for an open source application, as the CSS protection was mostly based on "secret decryption algorithm" (if I remember well), and licensee are not supposed to disclose it.

  • MedO
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VideoLAN might disappear !
Reply #13
According to the CCA FAQ you can get CSS licenses in Open Source projects. Like MPEG licensing, it's a matter of choice. Although VLC might get away with it (they're most likely too small to be sued), VLC are a bit naive if they think they can continue forever to base the product on the free use of patented technology, while all competitors are paying up. The legal limbo can't be there forever so at some point, they're going to have to go legit or "go underground".


I guess you assume this from the following text:

Quote
Can manufacturers of products for computers using the Linux operating system obtain a license to use CSS to manufacture a DVD player for Linux applications?

Absolutely. The DVD Copy Control Association would welcomes applications for the legal use of CSS from all manufacturers. In fact, Sigma Designs (www.sigmadesigns.com) is now marketing a DVD player for Linux under its license to manufacture products using CSS.


Read again. It says Linux applications, not Open Source.

  • eofor
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VideoLAN might disappear !
Reply #14
Read again. It says Linux applications, not Open Source.


Unless I'm mistaken (and please correct), an application can be Open Source, but the CSS decoding library will have to be a binary library. This is the way lots of OS projects use proprietary technology (video drivers under Linux, for example). Then again, I'm not a lawyer.

  • MedO
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VideoLAN might disappear !
Reply #15
Unless I'm mistaken (and please correct), an application can be Open Source, but the CSS decoding library will have to be a binary library. This is the way lots of OS projects use proprietary technology (video drivers under Linux, for example). Then again, I'm not a lawyer.


VLC is distributed under the GPL, and I think it is legally problematic to link GPL software and proprietary modules and distribute them as one package (see the NVIDIA kernel module). IANAL as well, though.