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Topic: foo_dsp_vlevel (Read 197368 times) previous topic - next topic
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Re: foo_dsp_vlevel

Reply #125
this component is NOT replaced by "EBU R128 normalizer" or "replaygain" as some people said.
I'm surprised anyone thinks that.  Replay Gain controls the volume setting for a track overall, and make no attempt to alter the dynamic range, nor is it meant to.

I know less about R128 Normaliser, but as I had it touted to me as an alternative to Replay Gain...

I create VLevel treated classical output files since years now. For casual listening (like: music in living room, me doing something in the kitchen). And of course this is the only reasonable option to listen to classical music in car. It's still needed. R128 is not for this, treatment is just too harsh, result gain is too unstable, torture for the ears.
I'm currently experimenting with Neutrons (Android) Compressor/(can also act as Limiter), which has typical options. Especially attack/release are of importance. So finally maybe I could get rid of the extra VLevel creation.
Unfortunately serious audio players on Android (Neutron and one that should not be named here) are more or less a usability disaster for me - Except Poweramp.

 

Re: foo_dsp_vlevel

Reply #126
Hello everyone. What is the prime function of Vlevel and its optimal setting. Thank you in advance for your answers

Re: foo_dsp_vlevel

Reply #127
Hello everyone. What is the prime function of Vlevel and its optimal setting. Thank you in advance for your answers
Eg: You listen in a louder environment. Like in a car. Classical, orchestral music may have very quiet parts but also very loud ones. Rather a problem in a casual listening environment. You may be permanently fiddling the volume knob because sometimes you cannot hear anything, then later it is so loud, killing your ears. VLevel controls that for you in a reasonable way (i. e., not in a too nervously). Keeps levels up when it's quiet, takes volume down right before the big boom (Example: Mahler Sym. 6, ending of movement 4). Default settings are pretty good start.

Re: foo_dsp_vlevel

Reply #128
Squeller, thank you for the feedback :)

Re: foo_dsp_vlevel

Reply #129
Hello everyone. What is the prime function of Vlevel and its optimal setting. Thank you in advance for your answers
Eg: You listen in a louder environment. Like in a car. Classical, orchestral music may have very quiet parts but also very loud ones. Rather a problem in a casual listening environment. You may be permanently fiddling the volume knob because sometimes you cannot hear anything, then later it is so loud, killing your ears. VLevel controls that for you in a reasonable way (i. e., not in a too nervously). Keeps levels up when it's quiet, takes volume down right before the big boom (Example: Mahler Sym. 6, ending of movement 4). Default settings are pretty good start.

Let me add to those reasons one more: Listening to old radio shows, and spoken live content. Voice volume fluctuated a lot at that time, specially when the speaker talks out of the mic when looking at others. A compresor just raises hum noise in that case but the voice stays almost the same (low) volume. Vlevel or volume leveling in general raises the volume dynamically in real time when this "holes" in audio appear. Think of this as "listening to podcasts with bad sound".