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After the PC donation...
Reply #25
Quote
What *EXACTLY* do not work?

Don't know if this help (I'm not very technically savvy), but I posted here about my findings of problems with pipe mppdec 1.95e to lame, solved by excanging mppdec 1.95e with 1.93j... (Problem occured in the form that the process of transcoding just stops.)
"ONLY THOSE WHO ATTEMPT THE IMPOSSIBLE WILL ACHIEVE THE ABSURD"
       - Oceania Association of Autonomous Astronauts

  • CiTay
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Reply #26
I asked Case what's broken with pipe support, and he said: "decoder thinks it can seek and tries to write fixed wav header, this produces nasty pop".

  • Frank Klemm
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Reply #27
I have two serious problems copying my data to the new
system. May be some one of you can help.

OS is Linux.
Data from old partitions is copied to new computer as files between 0.1 and 60 GByte. File system types are: ext2, vfat and reiserfs(3.5).

Problem 1:
File names with characters above 127 on vfat are wrongly interpreted.

"o => -:
"a => ?
~n => +-
"u => ?
"O => ?
´i => ?

It looks like the file names are stored using the MS-DOS
character set, but now interpreted as ISO8859-1 characters.

Mounting using 

mount -t vfat -o loop,codepage=437 /media/y/hdf1.image /old/mnt/f

do not change anything. I also tried some other code pages
and iocharsets, nothing changed, still exactly the same
misinterpretation.

FS was created under SuSE 6.4 under the kernel 2.2.15.


Problem 2:
Copying data from the old reiserFS 3.5 crashs the system
and corrupts data. Frequency is around 1 crash per hour.
Under 2.2.15...19 this file system was stable for years.

FS was created under SuSE 6.4 under the kernel 2.2.15.
Images were file system checked again before mounting.

Error messages:

Message from syslogd@elster at Mon Mar 29 02:37:52 2004 ...
elster kernel: vs-13065: update_stat_data: key [895627 896357 0x0 SD], found
item *3.5*[895627 896368 0x1 DIRECT], item_len 275, item_location 2290,
free_space(entry_count) 65535kernel BUG at prints.c:334!

Message from syslogd@elster at Mon Mar 29 03:32:51 2004 ...
elster kernel: vs-13065: update_stat_data: key [895627 896357 0x0 SD], found
item *3.5*[895627 896368 0x1 DIRECT], item_len 275, item_location 2290,
free_space(entry_count) 65535kernel BUG at prints.c:334!

Message from syslogd@elster at Mon Mar 29 04:39:59 2004 ...
elster kernel: vs-13065: update_stat_data: key [925724 942575 0x0 SD], found
item *3.5*[925724 942574 0x1 IND], item_len 8, item_location 2993,
free_space(entry_count) 2219kernel BUG at prints.c:334!


Any hints or ideas?
--  Frank Klemm

  • Sunhillow
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Reply #28
Problem1 (vfat --> reiserfs):
try an ftp transfer. this should translate different codepages

  • Frank Klemm
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Reply #29
Quote
I asked Case what's broken with pipe support, and he said: "decoder thinks it can seek and tries to write fixed wav header, this produces nasty pop".

It's a bug of the Microsoft API.

Current code works like:

unsigned long  total = 0;
int            samples;
float          buffer [ 1152 * 2 ];

write_header ( sample_freq, channels, 0xFFFFFFFF );

while ( ( samples = decode (buffer)) >= 0 ) {
  total += samples ;
  writesamples ( buffer, samples );
}

if ( seek (0L) == NO_ERROR )
    write_header ( sample_freq, channels, total );

The problem is that M$ seek() also return NO_ERROR even when seek fails.
A new FileIO module which must be programmed for every OS should remove
this problem.

class FileIO {
protected:
  ...
public:
  IsReadable ();
  IsWritable ();
  IsSeekable ();
  Read ( void*, size_t);
  Write ( const void*, size_t);
  Seek ( int64_t offset, enum whence);
} ;

I want to remove ALL this nasty things from the encoder and decoder.
--  Frank Klemm

  • jtclipper
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Reply #30
Nice to hear that this will be fixed.

I would like to provide to you some more examples.
Using the binaries found at rarewaves I run into troubles.

------------------------------------------------
Encoder
Version 1.14 with following command line produces a 36 kb mpc file ( basically an empty file )

Code: [Select]
lame --decode 1.mp3 - | mppenc - 1.mpc


Version 1.15r with the same syntax works just fine.
------------------------------------------------
Decoder

Both version 1.95e and 1.95z6 produce this result.

Code: [Select]
C:\Temp>mppdec 1.mpc - | lame.exe - 2.mp3
MPC Decoder  SV7  1.95e  3DNow/SSE   (C) 1999-2003 Buschmann/Klemm/Piecha/Wolf

decoding of file '1.mpc'
        to <stdout>

 171.9 kbLAME version 3.93 MMX  (http://www.mp3dev.org/)
CPU features: i387p, MMX (ASM used)s, SIMD,, SIMD2
 Using polyphase lowpass  filter, transition band: 15115 Hz - 15648 Hz
3Encoding <stdin> to 2.mp3
Encoding as 44.1 kHz 128 kbps j-stereo MPEG-1 Layer III (11x) qval=2
:51.94, SV 7.0, Profile Unstable/Experimental (--Alpha-- 1.15)

    0:00.02/    3:51.94 decoded ( 0.0%)
mppdec: write error: Broken pipe, repeat once more...
mppdec: write error: Invalid argument, repeat once more...


Version 1.1 works just fine

Code: [Select]
C:\Temp>mppdec 1.mpc - | lame.exe - 2.mp3
MPC Decoder  SV7  1.1  3DNow/SSE   (C) 1999-2002 Buschmann/Klemm/Piecha/Wolf

decoding of file '1.mpc'
        to <stdout>

 171.9 kbps,    3:51.94, SV 7.0, Profile Unstable/Experimental (--Alpha-- 1.15)

    0:00.01/    3:51.94 decoded ( 0.0%)LAME version 3.93 MMX  (http://www.mp3dev.org/)
CPU features: i387, MMX (ASM used), SIMD, SIMD2
Using polyphase lowpass  filter, transition band: 15115 Hz - 15648 Hz
Encoding <stdin> to 2.mp3
Encoding as 44.1 kHz 128 kbps j-stereo MPEG-1 Layer III (11x) qval=2
    1:40.14/    3:51.94 decoded (43.2%)


---------------------------------------------
I use lame.exe extensively and I never run into problems using pipes it might be a nice ides to look at the code that lame uses.
Dimitris

  • robUx4
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Reply #31
Quote
class FileIO {
protected:
   ...
public:
  IsReadable ();
  IsWritable ();
  IsSeekable ();
  Read ( void*, size_t);
  Write ( const void*, size_t);
  Seek ( int64_t offset, enum whence);
} ;

Frank, does it mean you want to use C++ as well ?

  • CiTay
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Reply #32
Frank's first problem seems to be caused by the old Linux kernel on his old PC. Files with Umlauts were not saved correctly, and later, this bug was silently fixed and no compatibility switch was introduced. So Kernels 2.0.xx through 2.2.xx don't go along too well with Kernel 2.4.xx and above, concerning certain filenames.

About MPC, Frank is away for easter, he will be back home in 1 1/2 weeks and that's when he starts coding.
  • Last Edit: 08 April, 2004, 08:17:01 AM by CiTay

  • AgentMil
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Reply #33
That is some nice news on the MusePack front... thanks for the heads up CiTay.
-=MusePack... Living Audio Compression=-

Honda - The Power of Dreams

  • Frank Klemm
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Reply #34
Quote
That is some nice news on the MusePack front... thanks for the heads up CiTay.

Some short information:

Windows works rock solid on the new computer, but I still have
serious trouble with Linux SuSE 9.0 . The most serious are
data losses on FAT32 partitions. When writing data to a FAT32
partition often the directory entry is not updated at the end.
This results in zero sized files and lost chains of clusters.

FAT32 is the only file system type usable for Windows XP and
Linux.
--  Frank Klemm

  • xmixahlx
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Reply #35
frank -

you can use captive-ntfs in linux (which uses Windows XP's ntfs drivers to access all ntfs drivers)

http://www.jankratochvil.net/project/captive/

(and i've never had any problems writing to fat16/32)


later

  • Frank Klemm
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Reply #36
Quote
frank -

you can use captive-ntfs in linux (which uses Windows XP's ntfs drivers to access all ntfs drivers)

http://www.jankratochvil.net/project/captive/

(and i've never had any problems writing to fat16/32)


later

See

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/history/154761
http://mailman.linuxtag.org/pipermail/debi...ber/004162.html

This serious bug is fixed in 2.4.25 (search for "128 M").
"FAT: Support large partition (> 128GB)" is a nice circumscription of
"FAT32: Drops files from time to time on >128 GB partitions".

As far as I know captive-ntfs is a part of 2.6.x, but all tries to install 2.6.5
didn't worked. I don't want to spend months of time to built a stable Linux
system. There are several other problems and bugs. This list is currently longer
than 40 entries. 20 of them have the status "don't have any idea what's wrong
or how to solve".

Work for this evening: Try to install standard kernel 2.4.26.
--  Frank Klemm

  • xmixahlx
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Reply #37
fat32
------
hmm... the fat32 bug needs an overloaded fat32 partition (i.e. > 85% full) and a deprecated linux 2.4.x kernel, so i'd call this problem solved at this point

captive-ntfs:
------
captive-ntfs isn't part of 2.6.5 that i know of (?)

2.6.x includes a rewritten ntfs driver that is more secure and can write to the ntfs partition in  a limited fashion (i.e can't write a file bigger than what is on the disk currently)

debian rant:
------
well, for starters, i wouldn't have used a *NIX OS that lacks ability to do actual work on.

perhaps try debian or debian based (libranet, mepis, knoppix) or gentoo/lfs/etc.
http://debian.org

debian unstable (and, if you wish, +experimental +unofficial) = excellent development and user environment with real package management/upgrade/etc. with full support for kernel 2.6 and alsa and all the necessities

it doesn't take a month, it takes a few hours to download and install a complete system...

perhaps if you provide the list of things that don't work for you others can offer solutions?


later

  • Jack Comics
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Reply #38
Perhaps it's just me, but if Linux is giving Frank a headache, and Windows is working fine... why not just use Windows entirely?  Is there any particular reason *why* Linux must be used?  Windows can be secured (i.e., turn off all unnecessary services, don't use Internet Explorer and Outlook/Outlook Express, and install and use a good anti-virus program and firewall), and there are free development environments on Windows, such as Cygwin and GCC, and now the free command-line C/C++ compiler that Microsoft released over the weekend.

Hopefully I don't offend anyone or something, just felt I needed to post what seems to be the easiest solution to me...

  • rjamorim
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Reply #39
Quote
Why has this thread degenerated into a "which OS to choose" ?

Because Klemm started talking about his OS problems. What did you expect?

Quote
About the partitions issue, i would keep my hands off any ntfs writing solution as it's just calling for more trouble. ntfs reading is ok though.


Captive NTFS uses the WindowsNT/2k/XP ntfs.sys read/write routines. It would only go wrong if the Microsoft driver is wrong.
Get up-to-date binaries of Lame, AAC, Vorbis and much more at RareWares:
http://www.rarewares.org

  • eltoder
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Reply #40
Quote
Captive NTFS uses the WindowsNT/2k/XP ntfs.sys read/write routines. It would only go wrong if the Microsoft driver is wrong.

Or if something is emulated in a wrong way. I have a big experience of using ntfs4win98 and was not always that great.

-Eugene
The  greatest  programming  project of all took six days;  on the seventh  day  the  programmer  rested.  We've been trying to debug the !@#$%&* thing ever since. Moral: design before you implement.

  • rjamorim
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Reply #41
Quote
Or if something is emulated in a wrong way. I have a big experience of using ntfs4win98 and was not always that great.

I never had any problem using Winternals' NTFS98, in both Win98 and WinMe.
Get up-to-date binaries of Lame, AAC, Vorbis and much more at RareWares:
http://www.rarewares.org

  • Frank Klemm
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Reply #42
Quote
Perhaps it's just me, but if Linux is giving Frank a headache, and Windows is working fine... why not just use Windows entirely?  Is there any particular reason *why* Linux must be used?  Windows can be secured (i.e., turn off all unnecessary services, don't use Internet Explorer and Outlook/Outlook Express, and install and use a good anti-virus program and firewall), and there are free development environments on Windows, such as Cygwin and GCC, and now the free command-line C/C++ compiler that Microsoft released over the weekend.

Hopefully I don't offend anyone or something, just felt I needed to post what seems to be the easiest solution to me...

Some Remarks:

- I also thought about dropping Linux support. At least this eases System 
  administration.

- The problem is not prefering Windows or Linux, but I like to support both.
  Some (better: a lot of) tools are existing only under Windows, other only
  under Linux.

- There are often questions about Mac-OS, there I can't help. I don't want
  drop Linux to the same state.

- Win32/Cygwin ist a third plattform, it can't substitute Linux/GCC.
  Plattforms I tested in past:
  - Linux/GCC
  - Linux/ICC (but licence server is not running anymore)
  - Windows/MS C++
  - Windows/Cygwin (not tested for a longer time)
  - Solaris/CC (not tested for a long time)
  - AIX/CC (not tested for a long time)

- The problem is not that I'm unable to administrate Windows or Linux.
  But I'm not able to fix bugs in Linux, because I'm not a wizzard.
  And my impression is that there are more bugs in Linux than Bill Gates
  can imagine ...

- There is no systematic system test in Linux. A 128 Gbyte HD bug was fixed
  in the last month, although these disks exist for more than 18 months.
  With a standard motherboards and RAID (3x 60 GB) for more than 4 years.
  Shame on you Mr. Torvald!
   
- Kernel bugs are not a question of Debian, Redhat or SuSE. It's very unlikely
  that they unintentionally fix such bugs.

- There is intentionally reserved space for a second Win and a second Linux
  installation (ask Citay). But the current distributions are all with "128 Gbyte
  bug inside".

- When I read the Changelog files of Linux, they sound like helloween
  documents. A lot of serious errors on critical places very fixed (FS layer).
  How many douzens are remaining???

- Any idea when Knoppix 3.4 is released (3.3 has also the 128 GB bug)???
  It is Debian based and I use it on some computers. See www.knopper.net

- In the past compiling under Linux AND Windows was a good idea. This
  avoid such ugly extremely Windows-specific (MAC) or extremely 
  Debian 2003-specific (-censored-) source code. BTW it makes often
  a lot of problems to port source from one to another Linux distribution.
  SuSE-2000 to Debian-2003 or even SuSE-2000 to SuSE-2003.
  • Last Edit: 20 April, 2004, 06:00:44 AM by Frank Klemm
--  Frank Klemm

  • Frank Klemm
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Reply #43
Quote
Quote
Why has this thread degenerated into a "which OS to choose" ?

Because Klemm started talking about his OS problems. What did you expect?

Quote
About the partitions issue, i would keep my hands off any ntfs writing solution as it's just calling for more trouble. ntfs reading is ok though.


Captive NTFS uses the WindowsNT/2k/XP ntfs.sys read/write routines. It would only go wrong if the Microsoft driver is wrong.

1. I don't want to start a OS discussion. I only thought dropping a note about my current work is a good idea.

2. Thanks for the information what Captive NTFS is. Using ntfs.sys sounds
more serious and more reliable than just another Linux NTFS hack.

3. I never had problems with NTFS under Windows. Stability on stable hardware
is great. BTW NT 4.0 without SP drives a 128 Gbyte NTFS partition without any
problems. Congratulations! Also congratulations for Dell. A 1997 built Computer
have no problems with a 128 GByte disk (OS is within the first 8 GB).
--  Frank Klemm

  • userXYZ
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Reply #44
Quote
Any idea when Knoppix 3.4 is released (3.3 has also the 128 GB bug)???
It is Debian based and I use it on some computers. See www.knopper.net


In one of the last c't Magazines there was a Knoppix 3.4 c't Edition. I think it was Magazine 4/2004, maybe you can get one.

EDIT: I regret, this is not an option. As you said that 128 GB Bug was fixed last month, so this version of Knoppix 3.4 won't have a kernel with that fix. Or if Linux 2.6 doesn't have that bug you could try that, the c't Edition has a boot option for a 2.6 series kernel.

Regards, David
  • Last Edit: 20 April, 2004, 06:06:07 AM by userXYZ

  • NumLOCK
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Reply #45
NTFS is a very reliable filesystem, its main problem is write performance. So to gain time during writes, it makes use of any small space that is currently under the HDD's head, without any other consideration. After a while this produces heavy fragmentation and read performance lowers a lot.  But this performance is suitable for benchmarks (since they measure short-term filesystem usage only). On any production server, the daily defragmentation process (Diskeeper etc) will constitute about 1/3 of the overall disk accesses !.

I don't think there are any stability issues with filesystems such as Reiserfs. I have a 2TB server in software RAID5 which runs day and night, pushing 250-300MB/s all the time. It operates on millions of very small files, and I've yet to experience a single corruption. Plus the files almost never fragment..

Also Reiserfs 3 is in "maintenance mode" (ie: no patches), and the author says he hasn't received a single bug report for years.

Frank, about Linux support I think it's more important than ever. Sincerely, I agree no OS is perfect and there can be surprising and/or unacceptable bugs, but they are there under Windows too (just hidden). I think more and more people (including myself) have switched or are switching to linux because they're fed up. I agree Microsoft does make some good stuff too, but in general it's a nice cover for something dirty.

It's a pleasure to install software in Gentoo Linux (on my laptop). Everything is snappy, and works great. World's best software is available with a single command. Now it's really starting to be a pleasure to use :-)

I don't think there's any 137GB issue with current kernels - as I said, I use 1.9TB partitions on a Redhat 8 (recently upgraded to Redhat 9) server.

For me the only annoying limitation in Linux was the 2GB issue, and in 2.4 and 2.6 kernels it's a thing of the past :-)

Almost every single thing that can be done under Windows can now be done under linux, plus plenty more, and (very important !!) it can be automated, which is (imho) something crucial to have on a computer  .  On Win32 everything looks cool, but batch files suck, the console uses obsolete DOS 2.0 codepage, etc..  The regular user doesn't care about it in the short run (because GUI is there), but isn't Musepack more about experienced users and long-term stuff? 

By the way, I'd be glad to help for a linux version if necessary.

Cheers !

Edit:  As an exemple of a horrible win32 bug, just think about the one which can destroy partitions during a kernel core dump..  It's been there for five years ! Isn't that serious?
  • Last Edit: 20 April, 2004, 07:04:44 AM by NumLOCK
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  • tigre
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Reply #46
OS-preference related discussion split to separate thread
Let's suppose that rain washes out a picnic. Who is feeling negative? The rain? Or YOU? What's causing the negative feeling? The rain or your reaction? - Anthony De Mello

  • p0wder
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Reply #47
Can the clipping problem be addressed in SV 7.5 instead of SV 8?

  • Frank Klemm
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Reply #48
Quote
Can the clipping problem be addressed in SV 7.5 instead of SV 8?

Transcoded from SV7.0/7.1 are still clipped, the information is lost.
Native SV7.5 encoder: Problem is solved.
--  Frank Klemm

  • Artemis3
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Reply #49
Quote
Plattforms I tested in past:
  - Linux/GCC
  - Linux/ICC (but licence server is not running anymore)
  - Windows/MS C++
  - Windows/Cygwin (not tested for a longer time)
  - Solaris/CC (not tested for a long time)
  - AIX/CC (not tested for a long time)

- The problem is not that I'm unable to administrate Windows or Linux.
  But I'm not able to fix bugs in Linux, because I'm not a wizzard.

How about the *BSDs? FreeBSD is very good, stable, well documented and organized IMO.

You can use bsd's cc, gcc and others too, even many versions can coexist peacefully without any troubles (example: just call gcc32 instead of gcc31, etc).
She is waiting in the air