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looking for high dynamic range samples

Hello, I'm working on a software project where I do companding among other things.
I was wondering if there are some decent samples with very high dynamic range.

I found a bunch of test files, where someone speaks at various levels, but I'd like to have some music samples, or something, too.
I don't want to limit myself to Harvard sentences.

The samples should be at least three seconds or so, and don't need to be longer than 10. It doesn't even have to be music at all, it can be just whatever, as long as it's nicely high dynamic range like quiet things and some loud things in the foreground or something.

 

Re: looking for high dynamic range samples

Reply #1
A lot of classical music is highly dynamic, particularly orchestral or piano or organ music.  The 1812 overture is one good-famous example (with the cannon shots), but I'm not really a classical listener so I don't have any other recommendations.  

When I listen to the Les Miserables soundtrack in the car I find myself turning the volume up & down, so I'd say it's highly-dynamic.

In the classic rock genre, maybe Pink Floyd, Dire Straits, or Fleetwood Mac.    But, I haven't measured  the dynamics on any of this stuff, that's just an impression from listening.  

Quote
The samples should be at least three seconds or so, and don't need to be longer than 10.
There are "micro-dynamics", but most loud & quiet passages (in music or movies, etc.)  are longer than a few seconds and such a short selection won't be of much use.


BTW - I prefer the term "dynamic contrast" when speaking about program material.   The EBU R128 standard calls it "Loudness Range".    "Dynamic range" generally refers to the technical limits of the hardware/equipment, or storage/transmission format.   i.e. The CD format has a dynamic range of 96dB (or 93dB?) but the music doesn't have that much dynamic contrast, and you wouldn't want it.


Re: looking for high dynamic range samples

Reply #3
The signal-to-noise ratio for 16 bit audio is 96.33 dB (or exactly log10(2^16)*20), but you can get even more perceived SNR out of noise shaping (dithering).

There are plenty of free 24 bit samples and tracks out there on the web that have a large SNR from the quiet on-mic preparation to the full sound, particularly with classical music where you can hear people moving or even breathing.

Schubert String Quartet No. 14, for example:
http://www.lindberg.no/hires/test/2L-093/

I know it's not within 10 seconds, but it does have a lot of range, and you can take the first 6 seconds of it.

Re: looking for high dynamic range samples

Reply #4
It doesn't even have to be music at all, it can be just whatever...
If it doesn't have to be "real world" you can just make some. In a DAW put two tracks with 100dB difference...

Re: looking for high dynamic range samples

Reply #5
Exactly what I was thinking.
I don't know of a single hi-rez record that comes with a guarantee of actual high dynamic range. There's always a possibility of high noise floor that makes hi-rez pretty much pointless (probably true for a lot of those recordings). But you can easily generate a very high dynamic range passage digitally by yourself, without introducing any noise above the quantization one.  Audacity will allow you to do that.

Re: looking for high dynamic range samples

Reply #6
Well the main application isn't music at all, I'm experimenting with companders used in radio transmissions.

Using music would be an easy source I though, since I know there is high dynamic range music out there.

I can upload the samples I'm using right now. One is this: https://www.audiocheck.net/audiotests_dynamiccheck.php
And the other one is just a tone generated in Audacity.

 
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