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Topic: Cause a closed headphones sound like an open one (Read 1438 times) previous topic - next topic

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  • Simagin
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Cause a closed headphones sound like an open one
New to forum. Hello everyone.

Does anybody knows of a foobar2000 filter or sound effect that could cause a closed headphones sound like an open one? I am not an expert, but my theory is that in a closed one, there is certain amount of sound that "bounce" inside the cup, so that "process"/filter could cause the signal to be clear, less prone to bounce, something like what a noise canceling circuit do. In that case the signal to cancel is outside noise, in the filter I talk, it would be an aproximation of that bounce signal inside the cup.

As I know, this can not be do it with an equalizer.

Thank you very much for your support.

  • DVDdoug
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Cause a closed headphones sound like an open one
Reply #1
Quote
As I know, this can not be do it with an equalizer.
An equalizer is about the best you can do.  If there is actual ringing or reverb there's nothing you can do about that, but most resonances can be tamed with EQ. 

The "sound quality" of headphones is 99 percent frequency response.  Distortion isn't usually an issue (depending on how loud you are listening) and things like "transient response" and "detail" are closely related to frequency response.    A lot of people think it's more complicated than that, but if you think about the 4 parameters identified by Ethan Winer, you'll realize that the other 3 don't really apply and it mostly comes down to frequency response.

You'd have to know the resonant frequencies for the particular headphone, then you can use an equalizer to knock-down those frequencies. 

If you can't find a frequency response curve for your headphones, you can just experiment with a graphic equalizer pulling-down one frequency-band at a time to see what helps.    Or, if you have a parametric equalizer, you sweep a notch filter...  Or sometimes it's better to sweep a band-boost filter to see what frequencies are being excited/exaggerated, and then apply a band-cut to fix the problem.

Quote
I am not an expert, but my theory is that in a closed one, there is certain amount of sound that "bounce" inside the cup,
I know what you mean, but a good closed headphone won't sound like that.  I generally prefer open headphones too, but I have a pair of Sennheiser HD280's.  I don't use them very often and sometimes I think they are going to have that "closed resonance" sound, but when I listen to them they actually sound fairly neutral/natural.  (They are not the "best" closed headphones, but they are often considered "one of the best for the money".)

What you are hearing is NOT actually the sound "bouncing around"...  I think it's the plastic resonating.  A 1-inch wavelength is about 15kHz, and I'm sure you are not hearing ringing/resonating at such high frequencies.
  • Last Edit: 15 April, 2014, 01:57:15 PM by DVDdoug

  • Simagin
  • [*]
Cause a closed headphones sound like an open one
Reply #2
Quote
As I know, this can not be do it with an equalizer.
An equalizer is about the best you can do.  If there is actual ringing or reverb there's nothing you can do about that, but most resonances can be tamed with EQ. 

The "sound quality" of headphones is 99 percent frequency response.  Distortion isn't usually an issue (depending on how loud you are listening) and things like "transient response" and "detail" are closely related to frequency response.    A lot of people think it's more complicated than that, but if you think about the 4 parameters identified by Ethan Winer, you'll realize that the other 3 don't really apply and it mostly comes down to frequency response.

You'd have to know the resonant frequencies for the particular headphone, then you can use an equalizer to knock-down those frequencies. 

If you can't find a frequency response curve for your headphones, you can just experiment with a graphic equalizer pulling-down one frequency-band at a time to see what helps.    Or, if you have a parametric equalizer, you sweep a notch filter...  Or sometimes it's better to sweep a band-boost filter to see what frequencies are being excited/exaggerated, and then apply a band-cut to fix the problem.

Quote
I am not an expert, but my theory is that in a closed one, there is certain amount of sound that "bounce" inside the cup,
I know what you mean, but a good closed headphone won't sound like that.  I generally prefer open headphones too, but I have a pair of Sennheiser HD280's.  I don't use them very often and sometimes I think they are going to have that "closed resonance" sound, but when I listen to them they actually sound fairly neutral/natural.  (They are not the "best" closed headphones, but they are often considered "one of the best for the money".)

What you are hearing is NOT actually the sound "bouncing around"...  I think it's the plastic resonating.  A 1-inch wavelength is about 15kHz, and I'm sure you are not hearing ringing/resonating at such high frequencies.


Hello,

DVDdoug thank you very much for your support. I have learn from you. Let me take advantage from you to ask a few more things. I have an open Philips SBC HP1000 with a super sound quality. I have search for a frecuency graph but I dont find it. Anyway it sounds so good that it nearly does not need to equalize it. I made a good investment in the past for it, and it pays off.

The other headphones is Bose AE2. I bought it for its confort and lightweight, and because it sounded good to me when I tested and had good reviews. But at home it sound worse than I would expect at first. But with lot of tune-toying I am seeing it has also a very good sound (not as best as my Philips, but good enought). My question was because I was trying to improve its sound without knowing much about what I was doing.

Let me ask. I have found two frecuency response graph for this headphones. How should I equalize: i.e., if I have a M type curve, should I start with an complementary W (inverted M) curve in the equalizer? that is supposed to compensate to achive a linear line graph (isn't it?), and from that start tuning step by step to my taste?

What I dont know is if it is the same 'resonance frecuencies' and 'frecuencies response', and if no, how I can take advantage of that data.

A problem with foobar equalizer I have found is that when I move any equalizer band, it does not respond after 4 to 6 seconds, with it is quite annoyed because I dont hear inmediate changes.

Thanks again. Regards

  • dhromed
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Cause a closed headphones sound like an open one
Reply #3
A problem with foobar equalizer I have found is that when I move any equalizer band, it does not respond after 4 to 6 seconds, with it is quite annoyed because I dont hear inmediate changes.


That delay is determined by the buffer length in Playback > Output. The slider should normally not be higher than 1000ms.

Cause a closed headphones sound like an open one
Reply #4
There is heaps of DSP plug-ins you can try.  You may not find any whose description matches exactly your problem but I suggest you try as many out as you can.  One of them might provide the outcome you are looking for.

http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index....showtopic=31899
http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index....showtopic=38291
http://wiki.hydrogenaudio.org/index.php?ti...:Components#DSP

  • Simagin
  • [*]
Cause a closed headphones sound like an open one
Reply #5
There is heaps of DSP plug-ins you can try.  You may not find any whose description matches exactly your problem but I suggest you try as many out as you can.  One of them might provide the outcome you are looking for.

http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index....showtopic=31899
http://www.hydrogenaudio.org/forums/index....showtopic=38291
http://wiki.hydrogenaudio.org/index.php?ti...:Components#DSP


Hey, Thank you very much, that is ton of info. I will have to read and toy for many time.