Skip to main content

Topic: How to recognize source flac rip CD-r (Read 2956 times) previous topic - next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
  • Marten
  • [*]
How to recognize source flac rip CD-r
Hi, i've downloaded some flacs with cue-files and eac logs, but i find them suspecious, it looks like they were ripped from CD-R's from a Philips CD-Recorder or from a straight burn from cd to CDr, is there a way to recognize this. When i rip from a cdr to flac, lossless audio checker says it is lossless but stil the source is not the original CD. (sorry for my poor english)

  • probedb
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
How to recognize source flac rip CD-r
Reply #1
Buy the CD, job done.

How to recognize source flac rip CD-r
Reply #2
+1

edit: talk about being "suspicious"
  • Last Edit: 22 January, 2014, 07:42:59 AM by includemeout
Listen to the music, not the media.

Best,
Nilson

  • Porcus
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
How to recognize source flac rip CD-r
Reply #3
Or buy an mp3/aac, then you are completely sure whether it has ever been through lossy compression.

How to recognize source flac rip CD-r
Reply #4
It shouldn't make a bit of difference if it was ripped from a CD-R if that CD-R is an AR-verifiable rip of the retail CD.

XLD for Mac now generates a log that therein identifies if the rip was a pressed CD or CD-R. Maybe torrent sites should stipulate only XLD be used until EAC "gets its act together."
The Loudness War is over. Now it's a hopeless occupation.

How to recognize source flac rip CD-r
Reply #5
Maybe if new posters actually read TOS9 they would think twice before asking for this sort of advice. 
Listen to the music, not the media.

Best,
Nilson

  • mjb2006
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
How to recognize source flac rip CD-r
Reply #6
A commonly available album probably has been ripped by many people and thus should produce plenty of AccurateRip hits, even if the audio data has errors or is offset. If the album has been out for a while and isn't found in the AR database at all, or only alternative pressings (different offsets) are found, then it's somewhat suspicious, but inconclusive; it could just be that the rip came from an uncommon pressing that no one has ripped yet.

TOS#9 is only violated if sources of illicit material are referenced, but I agree with the sentiment of the first responses: if you care about whether the rip is from CD-R, you should just seek out an original disc; it's the only way to be certain.

  • Neuron
  • [*][*][*]
How to recognize source flac rip CD-r
Reply #7
CDs are not like cassette tapes. If the source CD-R was burned from a lossless rip that was made from the original CD, the sound will be the same even if you repeated this process a thousand times (apart from ripping errors which are not too frequent with a good ripping program and CD in a good condition). The only reason why generation loss happens at all with digital is when people burn their lossy (mp3, aac, ogg etc.) files on CD-R and then rip it into lossy again. If the CD-R in question was really made from lossless, you can burn it to another CD, then that CD to another etc. and the result will still be the same.