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  • jbsf
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Manually creating a CUE sheet then splitting the FLAC
Firstly my apologies if this isn't the correct forum section - I've got a challenge with a FLAC file and missing CUE sheet so I'm hoping this is the right place.
I wouldn't describe myself as terribly technical so again my apologies if this is the wrong forum or something that is mundane to other members.

Short version is this:

I have a single large FLAC file, have lost the CUE file, the recording is one from a friend's performance [not a commercial], so all I have is the track listing of song title and where it starts/stops on the time continuum. I
The recordings not from a CD etc, ie I can't just rip it again or anything like that.

I need to be able to split the single large FLAC file into multiple FLACS, if I know the song title, and start/stop, how do I go about this?

I can happily manually edit the ID3 tags etc once I've split the file into multiples, that's all I want help with... [splitting the single Flac into multiple/individual files]

Am thinking this involves manually creating a CUE sheet .. then what next ? I can do on either a PC or Mac.

any help *much* appreciated,

  • phofman
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Manually creating a CUE sheet then splitting the FLAC
Reply #1

  • johnlgalt
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Manually creating a CUE sheet then splitting the FLAC
Reply #2
I came here for much the same reason as the OP.  @phofman, you're suggesting to use SoX to accomplish this?

  • mjb2006
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Manually creating a CUE sheet then splitting the FLAC
Reply #3
If you've manually edited a cue sheet, you can use CUETools (a Windows app) to do the split.

If you need to make a cue sheet and are having trouble, you might try CD Wave, which is a Windows app. (may require converting the FLAC to WAV first) ... EAC also allows cue sheet editing, although it's not quite as easy to use.

  • johnlgalt
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Manually creating a CUE sheet then splitting the FLAC
Reply #4
Thanks, I was looking for info on .cue sheet creation.

  • johnlgalt
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Manually creating a CUE sheet then splitting the FLAC
Reply #5
I should have remembered this from the past - I'm trying this out to see if 9 yera old software still works (David Ching also makes RegEditX, and He's been updating it again - and I've already bought mine).

http://www.dcsoft.com/products/cdrcue/

  • Porcus
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Manually creating a CUE sheet then splitting the FLAC
Reply #6
I have a single large FLAC file, have lost the CUE file, the recording is one from a friend's performance [not a commercial], so all I have is the track listing of song title and where it starts/stops on the time continuum.


You can edit it manually. Have a look at http://wiki.hydrogenaudio.org/index.php?ti..._sheet#Examples . Pick the first one and replace titles and times.


  • johnlgalt
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Manually creating a CUE sheet then splitting the FLAC
Reply #7
I'm trying to rebuild .cue files not only to recreate the copy of the disc (continuous mix DJ sets, usually 2 discs) but also to split the sing FLAC into multiple tracks.  If I have a cue sheet then Medieval's Cue splitter program works great.  If I don't have the .cue anymore, though, then it becomes a PITA b/c I have to 'guesstimate' for those that I cannot find accurate info for online (and I have a more than a few obscure and import discs that info is simply not out there thus far, such as bootlegs and personally recorded sets).

  • mjb2006
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Manually creating a CUE sheet then splitting the FLAC
Reply #8
Medieval's Cue splitter program works great.


...except for the fact that it removes a fraction of a second of audio at nearly every split point. You'll mind if that audio is not silence. That's why I recommend CUETools.

  • johnlgalt
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Manually creating a CUE sheet then splitting the FLAC
Reply #9
Did not know that.  Thanks.

  • fatso83
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Manually creating a CUE sheet then splitting the FLAC
Reply #10
In case you have a cd image of a commercial recording where the cue sheet is missing, then tracksplit from the Python Audio Tools package is perfect. It is quite suitable for scripted execution as well. Perfect when you have (like me) 300 cd images in flac you need converted to a sensible, tagged format :-)

Here is a video showing how to use it: tracksplit
  • Last Edit: 22 January, 2014, 05:36:05 PM by fatso83

Manually creating a CUE sheet then splitting the FLAC
Reply #11
If all you want is to split them, no need to mess around with manually edited cuesheets. You can just grab audacity and then cut the audio as much as you want. I'd go for this, especially for non-commercial files.

  • johnlgalt
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Manually creating a CUE sheet then splitting the FLAC
Reply #12
Three words.

Continuous.
Mix.
Discs.

That is why I want a .CUE sheet - to be accurate.

I wish there was a way to get a .CUE from accuraterip databases....That is really all I need.


Manually creating a CUE sheet then splitting the FLAC
Reply #13
You won't be any less accurate with audacity - you don't know the exact timings anyway since as you said, it's not a commercial CD, not even a CD at all - there is nothing to compare against to tell how "accurate" your manually generated cuesheet is.

  • CoRoNe
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Manually creating a CUE sheet then splitting the FLAC
Reply #14
@ jbsf:
I take you know how a cue-sheet looks like. Replace GENRE, DATE, PERFORMER and TITLE with metadata from your FLAC-file. Instead of MP3, append WAVE to your FLAC-filename.
Now for the index-times all you have to do is multiply the milliseconds by 0.75, because 1sec on an audio-cd consists of 75 so called frames. So if for example one of your tracks starts at 15:34.786 the index line would look like this: INDEX 01 15:34:59.
DC-Bass Source Mod: http://reino.degeelebosch.nl

Manually creating a CUE sheet then splitting the FLAC
Reply #15
I use Adobe Audition 3 and cut large files all the time into multiple files. When these files are burned onto a CD it plays through the 'cuts' and all you see is the track number change. There is NO change to the audio, no samples added or deleted. Consequently it does not have to be 'silent' where you perform the 'cut'. Once you get used to it (it's easy) you can separate 15-20 tracks out of a 70 minute file is a few minutes. Typing the files names takes the most time and setting the cut points is a snap. This can probably be done in Audacity as fast.

Personally I prefer the program to have a 1/2 second 'pad' at the track change. Some CD players 'mute when selecting tracks and the half second gets past that without an annoying delay.


  • 2Bdecided
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  • Developer
Manually creating a CUE sheet then splitting the FLAC
Reply #16
I use Adobe Audition 3 and cut large files all the time into multiple files. When these files are burned onto a CD it plays through the 'cuts' and all you see is the track number change. There is NO change to the audio, no samples added or deleted. Consequently it does not have to be 'silent' where you perform the 'cut'. Once you get used to it (it's easy) you can separate 15-20 tracks out of a 70 minute file is a few minutes. Typing the files names takes the most time and setting the cut points is a snap. This can probably be done in Audacity as fast.

Personally I prefer the program to have a 1/2 second 'pad' at the track change. Some CD players 'mute when selecting tracks and the half second gets past that without an annoying delay.

Unless you've told it to cut on CD sector boundaries, or your CR writing software re-works the track splits, you will get glitches at non-silent transitions.

CDwave is quicker, free, and glitchless. It can output .wav files or cuesheets. It can auto split if the audio has quiet-ish sections between tracks.

Cheers,
David.