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Hardware required for listening room acoustic test
About a third of the way towards a DIY attic listening space and am reading up on the finished room treatments and testing (thanks Ethan & others)
My list of hardware is based on budget and availability.

Behringer Emc 8000 mic (optional stand)
Behringer PS 400 phantom power supply
XLR m/f 5m mic cable
XLR to USB 1m cable

and my questions:

Have I missed anything?
Is the PS 400 good enough for this purpose.
Are there any potential compatibility problems with the USB connections.
Will the fan and drive noise from the notebook/computer be a problem.

Thanks for your help

Paul






  • mixminus1
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Hardware required for listening room acoustic test
Reply #1
Elaborate on the "XLR to USB 1m cable" - by definition, that's an audio interface, so: what brand and model?
"Not sure what the question is, but the answer is probably no."

Hardware required for listening room acoustic test
Reply #2
Elaborate on the "XLR to USB 1m cable" - by definition, that's an audio interface, so: what brand and model?

Unsure, just looking for a way to connect the lot together

Hardware required for listening room acoustic test
Reply #3
Elaborate on the "XLR to USB 1m cable" - by definition, that's an audio interface, so: what brand and model?

Right, after this question and a bit of googling i think using a Behringer 302USB Premium 5-Input Mixer with XENYX Mic Preamp and USB/Audio Interface (Amazon for $50) would be a better option.

  • Melomane
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Hardware required for listening room acoustic test
Reply #4
i think it is more KISS using this calibrated usb microphone:

http://www.minidsp.com/products/acoustic-measurement/umik-1
  • Last Edit: 06 April, 2013, 09:19:53 AM by Melomane
Music is my first love.

  • MikeFord
  • [*][*][*]
Hardware required for listening room acoustic test
Reply #5
i think it is more KISS using this calibrated usb microphone:

http://www.minidsp.com/products/acoustic-measurement/umik-1

That is what I was thinking, you need less of a "good" microphone vs a calibrated one known to work with whatever software you choose.

Hardware required for listening room acoustic test
Reply #6
i think it is more KISS using this calibrated usb microphone:

http://www.minidsp.com/products/acoustic-measurement/umik-1


[That is what I was thinking, you need less of a "good" microphone vs a calibrated one known to work with whatever software you choose. MikeFord]

Apologies for the delay, I couldn't log on at home over the weekend, possibly because I was still logged on at work.
It certainly looks to be the simpler option, I will have to do a bit more reading.
I would still be interested in any views on how background noise may affect a test.
Also regarding the freeware programs, as Java is a bit 'suspect', what can be used in its place.

Thanks Paul


Hardware required for listening room acoustic test
Reply #7
i think it is more KISS using this calibrated usb microphone:

http://www.minidsp.com/products/acoustic-measurement/umik-1

Before anyone rushes to order a microphone from minidsp.com they appear to have had lots of problems with the calibration of it recently. I am not sure if it has been completely resolved but if you are interested or concerned their forum has lots of chatter about it.

Hardware required for listening room acoustic test
Reply #8
i think it is more KISS using this calibrated usb microphone:

http://www.minidsp.com/products/acoustic-measurement/umik-1

Before anyone rushes to order a microphone from minidsp.com they appear to have had lots of problems with the calibration of it recently. I am not sure if it has been completely resolved but if you are interested or concerned their forum has lots of chatter about it.



There is a not-so-hidden agenda associated with inexpensive electret microphones which are the core technology of virtually every low and medium cost measurement mic. Their sensitivity can be temperature, humidity, and time sensitive.  Anybody who uses these mics and wants reliable sensitivity measurements has a microphone calibrator which is itself far more inhrently stable.  The mic still changes, but you know what it changed to.

Usually frequency response is more consistent than sensitivity.

Hardware required for listening room acoustic test
Reply #9
i think it is more KISS using this calibrated usb microphone:

http://www.minidsp.com/products/acoustic-measurement/umik-1

Before anyone rushes to order a microphone from minidsp.com they appear to have had lots of problems with the calibration of it recently. I am not sure if it has been completely resolved but if you are interested or concerned their forum has lots of chatter about it.



There is a not-so-hidden agenda associated with inexpensive electret microphones which are the core technology of virtually every low and medium cost measurement mic. Their sensitivity can be temperature, humidity, and time sensitive.  Anybody who uses these mics and wants reliable sensitivity measurements has a microphone calibrator which is itself far more inhrently stable.  The mic still changes, but you know what it changed to.

Usually frequency response is more consistent than sensitivity.

Good explanation of the difference, this http://www.minidsp.com/forum/18-umik-quest...=6&start=18 is the latest discussion with news regarding the supplier.